To Keep You Inspired … Our Club Fit Members!

For our members and for us, fitness is a way of life.

For our members and for us, fitness is a way of life.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our members inspire us every day. YOU are why we do what we do. Listen to what some Club Fit members had to say during last month’s Member Appreciation Weeks.

Tess Cerra
“Shortly after joining Club Fit 3 years ago, my husband suddenly passed away. Thanks to all of the club activities, and the friendship of the members, I was able to get through that difficult time. Club Fit was a wonderful lifesaver for me. I will be forever grateful!

Beth Klewan
Club Fit is more than a health club to me. It’s a place that enhances my life. I have made friendships and have improved my health. I feel that Club Fit is a place to enhance your physical and emotional health. I feel like the people that work here are my family and my friends. Thank you for being my health club. Everyone at Club Fit seems to be concerned about myself and all members.

Ophelia Hill
Club Fit is an environment which houses a group of multi-ethnic, highly professional individuals focused on giving us a program of healthy, varied, motivating exercises for all. Special events and other surprises keep things exciting and inspire us.

Deb Ross
Club Fit motivates me to stay young, stay fit and to keep going for my kids. Once day, when they are strong athletes I can keep up with them and not be old!

Usha Ragheran
Hmmm…where do I begin? Many Group Fitness classes, like Zumba (with awesome instructors) Danceology (unique to Club Fit) and Barre! The M.E.L.T. class and Definitions class are amazing. And…drum roll…the incredible socialization and sense of community we bet. Some of my best friends are my “exercise mates”. I love the Energy Center — very reasonable and wow…lots of toys!

Sandy Olsen
Club Fit motivates me to be as fit as I can get. I became a member with my daughter who was diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis her freshman year in college. The water classes were suggested for her joints and it helped greatly. That was over 15 years ago and I’ve met wonderful friends here. Love it!

Theresa Prestopino
This last year, I lost 13 pounds. My best friend encouraged me to get strong and gave me her guest pass to go to Sunday’s Definitions class with Shelby. The class includes a lot of equipment for an hour — it absolutely challenged me. It also made me realize I needed to take back my health. It is never too late to make time for happiness.

Andrea Sonenberg
Going to Club Fit and working out gave me emotional strength during a very difficult time in my life. I’ve been able to keep healthy and physical as well. It’s been a life-saver (and a life investment) for more than 25 years!

Michael Carozza
Club Fit is a great club. I Have been a member for the past 18 years. Always upgrading equipment… What keeps me motivated is that I will be 69 years old and don’t take any medication. Doctor tells me it’s all because of my exercise routine!

Elizabeth Plager
I like that there is something for the whole family to do at Club Fit!

Catherine Zsiday
Club Fit has helped me maintain my weight loss for the past 9 years. Your staff is an awesome group of people. Keep up the good work!

Brian Lett
I enjoy the variety of equipment and classes that allow me to achieve a well-balanced level of fitness.

Paul Pecoraro
Was a Club Fit member years ago, and now I am motivated to get back in excellent condition.

Janet Lyman
Group Fitness classes motivate me! Cycle, 20/20/20 and BODYPUMP. Love seeing my successes through MYZONE!

Janet Tinari
The Chair Yoga class is great. Instructor, Lucy, is so good. She motivates me to get here!

Karen Lett
Club Fit has healed me and keeps me healthy… physically, emotionally, mentally and socially. It is truly my second home. I love the classes, the instructors and the racquetball opportunities! I love that I can take the Yoga Teacher Training at Club Fit!

JV Aquatics Center closing Monday, August 29th

Jefferson Valley Operational Alert:

The Aquatics center will be closing for 2 weeks beginning Monday, August 29th through Sunday, September 11th for necessary annual maintenance. The Aquatic Center will re-open on Monday, September 12th.

During the closure members are welcome to use our Aquatic Center in Briarcliff. Please pardon the inconvenience as we renew and refurbish the Aquatics Center.

In Health,

Lynne Welling

General Manager

Bike Right, Bike Fit

by Meryle Richman, PT, DPT, MS, CST, RYT

With the beginning of fall and changing of the leaves, people enjoy being outdoors riding their bicycles. The physical therapists at Ivyrehab can teach you preventative measures to avoid bike injuries.

For the average bike rider cycling involves a limited repetitive motion. At an average cadence of 90 revolutions per minute (RPM), a bicycle rider cranks out 5,400 strokes each hour. This becomes 1.5 million strokes in 5,000 miles. So you can just imagine how this can lead to a lot of wear and tear on the cartilage, ligaments and joints of the knee.

I. What you need to know about for a proper Bike Fitting:

The most common bike fitting errors include a saddle that is too high or too low, excessive handlebar reach that causes you to lean too far forward, and improper alignment of the pedal and shoe.

The American Physical Therapy Association recommends that when evaluating a cyclist for a proper bike fit the following assessment be performed:

●Foot to Pedal: The ball of the foot should be over the pedal spindle (the bar in the middle of the pedal on which the pedal “spins”). For cleat users, it is important to establish a neutral position of the cleat on the shoe. This will allow for neutral tracking of the knee through the pedal stroke.

●Saddle and Knee/Pedal Position: Saddle height should allow the knee to be slightly bent at the most extended portion of the pedal stroke. A suggested knee angle at dead-bottom-center is 30- 35 degrees while the foot is in the pedaling position.

●Saddle tilt: Saddle tilt for normal-endurance bicycling should be level. Pay close attention to the portion of the saddle that will be supporting the ischial tuberosities, or “sitting bones.” Cut out saddles allow for better tissue oxygenation. A well-fit saddle will provide the best comfort and results.

●Saddle Position in relation to the handlebars: Saddle position should allow the knee to be over the foot (metatarsal heads, ball of foot) at the 3-o’clock position of the bicycle crank-arm. The foot should be in a normal pedaling position.

●Handlebars: The position of the handlebars will affect the comfort of the hands, shoulders, neck and back, as well as the overall handling of the bicycle. For the Recreational Rider the trunk angle (trunk from horizontal reference line) should be angled between 40-80 degrees, and the shoulder angle (trunk to humerus) should be between 80 and 90 degrees. The handlebar position, should allow the hands to be slightly wider than the shoulder width. This is for comfort of the hands, arms and shoulders. For the Road Rider the trunk angle (trunk from horizontal reference) should be between 30 and 40 degrees, and the shoulder angle (trunk to humerus) should be between 90 and 100 degrees. The handlebar position should be approximately 2 centimeters (or .79 inches) wider than shoulder width for comfort of the hands, arms and shoulders.

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The ideal position of the knee in pedaling is to have the knee over the pedal and ball of the foot at the 3 o’clock position.

II. Common Overuse Injuries with Biking

● liotibial Band Syndrome (IT Band):

Possible causes are too-high saddle, leg length difference, and misaligned bicycle cleat for those who use clipless pedals. Pain is caused when the band becomes tight and rubs over the bony prominences of the hip (greater trochanter) and/or the knee (lateral epicondyle). When the knee is flexed at 30 degrees and is at the bottom of the stroke motion, there is friction on the tendon attachment. Tight inflexible lower extremity muscles may also worsen the condition. The band becomes tight and pulls at the hip and knee causing pain. In order to minimize knee and hip pain, it is important to pedal with low resistance and keep the cadence at 80-90 rpm.

● Chondromalacia:
Another common knee injury is anterior knee pain, such as chondromalacia. This involves irritation of the cartilage behind the patellar and patellar femoral tracking of the knee. If there is a muscle imbalance of the muscles of the anterior thigh known as the quadriceps, the outside muscle (vastus lateralis obliqus) becomes tight and the muscle on the inside of the thigh (vastus medialis obliqus) becomes weak. This results in lateral movement of the patellar which does not “track” smoothly in the patellar groove and results in irritation to the patellar (patellar-femoral maltracking) and anterior knee pain.

● Hamstring Tendinitis
Possible causes are inflexible hamstrings, high saddle, misaligned bicycle cleat for those who use clipless pedals, and poor hamstring strength.
● Neck Pain
Possible causes include poor handlebar or saddle position. A poorly placed handlebar might be too low, at too great a reach, or at too short a reach. A saddle with excessive downward tilt can be a source of neck pain.
● Lower Back Pain
Possible causes include inflexible hamstrings, low cadence, using your quadriceps muscles too much in pedaling, poor back strength, and too-long or too-low handlebars.
● Hand Numbness or Pain
Possible causes are short-reach handlebars, poorly placed brake levers, and a downward tilt of the saddle.
●Numbness or Pain
Possible causes are using quadriceps muscles too much in pedaling, low cadence, faulty foot mechanics, and misaligned bicycle cleat for those who use clipless pedals.

III. Prevention of Injuries with Stretching & Exercising

●Warm up for 5 – 10 minutes with gentle movement. Stretch slowly and gradually. Also do some stretching after you ride
●Exhale as you gently stretch muscles. .Develop a stretching routine for the quadriceps, hamstrings, ilio-tibial band, piriformis and calves Also, do stretching for your neck, trunk, chest, wrists and hands.

●Hold stretches for 15 – 20 seconds; 2 – 3 repetitions

●Gradual resistive exercise for back musculature, abdominals, legs and arms

●Progress to closed chain exercises

●Progressive functional activities and agility skills

●Partial squats, step – ups and step – downs, lunges

●Proprioceptive training – balancing exercises

●Cross training: spinning, jogging, swimming

IV. Choosing a Correct Helmet

When you are choosing a helmet, fit is very important. For a helmet to protect you it must fit correctly. Other factors to know about a proper hat fit are:

●Make sure the helmet fits on the top of your head and does not tip backwards or forwards. It should be parallel to the ground. There should be about 2 fingers breadth between your eyebrow and the edge of the helmet
●The helmet should not move when you shake or move your head from side to side or up and down.
●Straps should always be fastened and fit snugly. It should also meet certain safety criteria. Look for “Snell Certified” or Meets ANSI Z904 Standard” on the box or on the helmet itself.
●There should be no cracks inside the helmet

Whether you are a beginning bicyclist or advanced rider and have and have an injury that is “holding you back from riding” our experienced and dedicated licensed physical therapists can help you get started. With Direct Access a prescription is not required to be evaluated. Contact Ivyrehab Briarcliff (914) 762 – 2222 and Ivyrehab Jefferson Valley (914) 245 – 8807 or visit our Website: www.ivyrehab.com to learn more about Direct Access.

Reference: www.apta.com

biking

biking

Fall is on its way! Are you ready?

Fall is coming and you know what that means! It’s time to hit the ground running. Literally and figuratively. It’s a busy time of year for everyone . . . especially families. It’s about coordinating schedules, getting kids back into the routine of heading to school every day, preparing for meetings, switching up your gym routines and restoring a sense of order back to life.

It doesn’t have to be a bummer and maybe even some of you can’t wait for the heat to break and the school bells to ring. We have some great things for kids that you might just love! Check out Breakfast Club Fit Kids at Club Fit Briarcliff. Drop off the kids at 7am and let them hang with us, work on homework, have breakfast or just chill out until the buses arrive! We’ll have movie nights and plenty of Parent’s Nights Out, so you’ll be able to relax while the kids are having fun! Keep an eye out for the School’s Out Camp Calendars too. That’s always a favorite during the school year! Of course we’ve always got your kids covered for various sports programs and swim lessons! Not to mention the awesome Swim Teams at each location! Our Jefferson Valley Swim Team deserves a special shout out for all their accomplishments last year!

For those of you who will mourn the Summer, don’t worry! Summer will be here again before you know it. Try to take advantage of the awesome Fall weather- take a hike with the Hiking Club, go for a run . . . maybe register for a Turkey Trot or any 5K! We’ll have a Paint Nite at Jefferson Valley on September 23rd that is sure to be a great time!

Be sure to look for the new Group Fitness Schedule, coming out on September 19th! There are so many great things to be excited about this Fall and we can’t wait to see you in the club!

Group four friends in helmets riding bikes on a forest path

Group four friends in helmets riding bikes on a forest path

Better Balance Now!

Ivy Rehab
Fall Prevention
Meryle Richman, PT, DPT, MS, CST, RYT

As we age the ability to maintain balance becomes more difficult. Many factors influence good balance, some of them are biological; and some we are able to influence and are able to improve. Balance and stability are important factors for aging adults to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Loss of balance is the primary factor in falls, which often results in serious injuries.

Good balance is dependent on sensory input form the eyes, the correct functioning of the balance system in the inner ear, posture and center of gravity and our ability to sense the position and movement in our feet, legs and arms. Vision affects the balance system, as the eyes send messages to the brain telling us where objects are in space.

Aging adults are affected by a loss of muscle mass and strength. This is associated with an increased risk of falls and hip fractures. It also has a great affect on maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Weakness in the ankle musculature may cause difficulty in recovering lost balance more quickly. Strong quadriceps muscles are necessary for good balance and walking. Evidence shows the strength and aerobic training can lead to a reduction in falls.

Loss of flexibility occurs with age. This may lead to difficulty climbing stairs, transferring from sit to stand and or getting out of bed without difficulty. Much of the loss of flexibility is due to inactivity. Flexibility exercises, stretches, gentle yoga will help improve flexibility of major muscle groups and therefore improve ones ability to complete everyday activities.

Postural changes develop as people age but not because they age. Rounded shoulders, forward head postures, increased thoracic curves in the spine are common postural changes. These changes affect the center of gravity in the body moving it forward. With changes in the center of gravity, older adults are more prone to loss of balance and an increased risk of falls.

Medications also contribute to the deterioration of the balance system. Research has shown that adding new medications in the previous two weeks increases the risk for falling.

There are many ways we can adapt to the changes in our bodies as we age. Some helpful tips include:

1. Promote safety in the home by using non-skid surfaces, eliminating area rugs & improve lighting in the home

2. Get a yearly eye exam

3. Proper nutrition and hydration

4. Know the side effects of your medication

5. Use caution with pets running around in your home

5. Different forms of exercise, such as strengthening exercises, flexibility and stretches, postural exercise, yoga, tai chi, and aerobic exercise such as walking, will all contribute to decreasing the risk of falls and improve your balance.

Guidelines from The American College of Sports Medicine suggest that:

1) Healthy adults under the age of 65 should aim for:

– Moderate intense cardiovascular exercises 30 minutes a day (aerobic exercise), five days a week or vigorous intense exercises 20 minutes a day, 3 days a week and strengthening-exercises twice a week

– Flexibility or stretching exercises are also recommended a minimum of 2-3 days a week

2) Healthy adults 65 years or older:

– Low-to-Moderate aerobic exercises, 30 minutes a day, 5 times a week and gentle strengthening-exercises (very light weights), 2- 3 times a week

– Flexibility or stretching exercises at a minimum of 2-3 times a week

Types of Aerobic and Low-to-Moderate Exercises:
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If you want to determine your fitness level, refer to the reference guide from The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

For beginners, you can simply start out by learning the basics of the talk test, which is a rule of thumb for doing moderate-intensity activity and you can still talk, but not sing during an activity. However, if you are doing a vigorous-activity you would want to learn how to find your target heart rate and determine what intensity range you should be exercising at for optimal cardiac performance.

Check out the Stay Healthy Website to determine a simple way to find your target heart rate at: www.cancer.org/healthy/toolsandcalculators/calculators/app/target-heart-rate-calculator. Once you find your target heart rate, wearing a heart rate monitor will make it easier to monitor your desired rate.

If you would like to improve your current level of fitness, but still have questions about how to begin a safe exercise program if you had an injury or illness, our experienced and dedicated licensed physical therapists can help you get started. With Direct Access a prescription is not required to be evaluated. Contact Ivyrehab Briarcliff (914) 762 – 2222 and Ivyrehab Jefferson Valley (914) 245 – 8807 or visit our Website: www.ivyrehab.com to learn more about Direct Access.

References:
(1) Exercise: Designing a Cardiac exercise Program. New York-Presbyterian Hospital. Retrieved September 2, 2011 from http://nyp.org/health/cardiac_exercis3.html
(2) American College of Sports Medicine Position Stand. Retrieved September 2, 2011 from http://www.mhhe.com/hper/nutrition/williams/student/appendix_i.pdf

Which Athletic Shoe Should I Buy?

Meryle Richman, PT, DPT, MS, CST, RYT
Senior Director at Ivyrehab Briarcliff and Ivyrehab Jefferson Valley

Buying an athletic shoe involves multiple considerations!

It is important to wear proper footwear to avoid ankle and foot pain or injury. Factors that should be considered in determining which shoe is right for you include:

The activities that will be performed, the construction of the shoe, what surfaces you will be on and the type of foot you have. Each sport or activity involves different movements or jumping and shoes are designed to fit the activity. Running, for instance, primarily involves movement in a straight line. Basketball and aerobics involve jumping and time spent on the forefoot. For example, playing tennis which involves side – to – side movements in a shoe with supports for straight movement could result in an ankle sprain. In addition, if you are involved in weight training activities for the lower extremities, wear different shoes than you use for impact sports. The extra weight from training compresses the cushioning and affects the shock absorption of the shoe. Cross trainers should only be used for short distance running (less than two miles). Some activities are similar so it may not be necessary to buy different shoes for each activity.

Uneven surfaces cause increased movement in the foot and ankle. This makes the ankle joint and the foot more vulnerable to injury. For example, running on rough terrain calls for an athletic shoe that is wider. This increases medial and lateral stability and decreases the risk for ankle injury.

Important tips to know before purchasing an athletic shoe:

● It is important to evaluate shoe construction prior to making a purchase

● Bend the shoe from toe to heel. It should not bend in places that your foot does not. In addition, if you push it down, it should not rock

● Place the shoes down and look at them from behind to assure the shoes are symmetrical

●You should also check wear patterns because this will tell you when to buy a new shoe

● There are 2 basic foot types: pronators and supinators:
(a) Pronator type foot is: limited big toe mobility, a heel that appears to turn out and the inner border appears to flatten when stepping. This type of foot requires a” motion control” athletic shoe. These shoes have firmer heels and a straight seam down the middle of the sole.

(b) Supinator type foot is: high and rigid arches and a heel that turns to the inside. This type of foot requires a shoe with more cushioning especially if you plan on using it for running. The sole of the shoe usually has a curved seam down the middle.

In summary, no two feet are alike even on the same person. However, by using basic guidelines, you can reduce the risk of injury.

For a free 10 minute screening, contact Ivyrehab Briarcliff at (914) 762 – 2222 or Ivyrehab Jefferson Valley at (914) 245 – 8807. With Direct Access a prescription is not required to be evaluated and treated. Visit our Website: www.ivyrehab.com to learn more about Direct Access.

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References:

1. Athletic Footwear and Orthoses in Sports Medicine – INDER https://www.google.com/search?q=D.G.+Sharnoff+Matthew+B.+Werd%2C+%E2%80%8EE.+Leslie+Knight+-+2010+-+%E2%80%8EMedical&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8