Fitness Success Story: Janet Murff

Janet and Candice

Club Fit Member Janet Murff and Personal Trainer Candice O’Brien — working together to help Janet reach her goals.

Healthier and happier — Club Fit Member Janet Murff started training with Personal Trainer Candice O’Brien in 2015 and is now stronger, fitter, and happier.

I’d like to express my appreciation to my trainer Candice and Club Fit. I am thrilled! The physical & mental benefits of exercise are amazing.

When I made my decision in November 2015 to have a personal trainer, I was out of shape and feeling stressed from two years of the life changing activities of caring for one’s parents; too much driving, too much sitting. Realizing what a difference a trainer would mean to my success, I signed up — and as luck would have it, I was paired with the right trainer from day one. I began with the goals of improved health and fitness. I knew that I could only commit to two or three gym visits per week. Consistency would make it work. Weight loss was far down my list. Today, I am much stronger, fitter, more toned, and happier than I was a year ago. Weight loss has been a bonus. I know that I could not have done this alone. I am excited to set new goals for 2017 and look forward to continue working with Candice to help me reach these.

Congratulations to Janet on her hard work and her commitment to health!

Bike Right, Bike Fit

by Meryle Richman, PT, DPT, MS, CST, RYT

With the beginning of fall and changing of the leaves, people enjoy being outdoors riding their bicycles. The physical therapists at Ivyrehab can teach you preventative measures to avoid bike injuries.

For the average bike rider cycling involves a limited repetitive motion. At an average cadence of 90 revolutions per minute (RPM), a bicycle rider cranks out 5,400 strokes each hour. This becomes 1.5 million strokes in 5,000 miles. So you can just imagine how this can lead to a lot of wear and tear on the cartilage, ligaments and joints of the knee.

I. What you need to know about for a proper Bike Fitting:

The most common bike fitting errors include a saddle that is too high or too low, excessive handlebar reach that causes you to lean too far forward, and improper alignment of the pedal and shoe.

The American Physical Therapy Association recommends that when evaluating a cyclist for a proper bike fit the following assessment be performed:

●Foot to Pedal: The ball of the foot should be over the pedal spindle (the bar in the middle of the pedal on which the pedal “spins”). For cleat users, it is important to establish a neutral position of the cleat on the shoe. This will allow for neutral tracking of the knee through the pedal stroke.

●Saddle and Knee/Pedal Position: Saddle height should allow the knee to be slightly bent at the most extended portion of the pedal stroke. A suggested knee angle at dead-bottom-center is 30- 35 degrees while the foot is in the pedaling position.

●Saddle tilt: Saddle tilt for normal-endurance bicycling should be level. Pay close attention to the portion of the saddle that will be supporting the ischial tuberosities, or “sitting bones.” Cut out saddles allow for better tissue oxygenation. A well-fit saddle will provide the best comfort and results.

●Saddle Position in relation to the handlebars: Saddle position should allow the knee to be over the foot (metatarsal heads, ball of foot) at the 3-o’clock position of the bicycle crank-arm. The foot should be in a normal pedaling position.

●Handlebars: The position of the handlebars will affect the comfort of the hands, shoulders, neck and back, as well as the overall handling of the bicycle. For the Recreational Rider the trunk angle (trunk from horizontal reference line) should be angled between 40-80 degrees, and the shoulder angle (trunk to humerus) should be between 80 and 90 degrees. The handlebar position, should allow the hands to be slightly wider than the shoulder width. This is for comfort of the hands, arms and shoulders. For the Road Rider the trunk angle (trunk from horizontal reference) should be between 30 and 40 degrees, and the shoulder angle (trunk to humerus) should be between 90 and 100 degrees. The handlebar position should be approximately 2 centimeters (or .79 inches) wider than shoulder width for comfort of the hands, arms and shoulders.

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The ideal position of the knee in pedaling is to have the knee over the pedal and ball of the foot at the 3 o’clock position.

II. Common Overuse Injuries with Biking

● liotibial Band Syndrome (IT Band):

Possible causes are too-high saddle, leg length difference, and misaligned bicycle cleat for those who use clipless pedals. Pain is caused when the band becomes tight and rubs over the bony prominences of the hip (greater trochanter) and/or the knee (lateral epicondyle). When the knee is flexed at 30 degrees and is at the bottom of the stroke motion, there is friction on the tendon attachment. Tight inflexible lower extremity muscles may also worsen the condition. The band becomes tight and pulls at the hip and knee causing pain. In order to minimize knee and hip pain, it is important to pedal with low resistance and keep the cadence at 80-90 rpm.

● Chondromalacia:
Another common knee injury is anterior knee pain, such as chondromalacia. This involves irritation of the cartilage behind the patellar and patellar femoral tracking of the knee. If there is a muscle imbalance of the muscles of the anterior thigh known as the quadriceps, the outside muscle (vastus lateralis obliqus) becomes tight and the muscle on the inside of the thigh (vastus medialis obliqus) becomes weak. This results in lateral movement of the patellar which does not “track” smoothly in the patellar groove and results in irritation to the patellar (patellar-femoral maltracking) and anterior knee pain.

● Hamstring Tendinitis
Possible causes are inflexible hamstrings, high saddle, misaligned bicycle cleat for those who use clipless pedals, and poor hamstring strength.
● Neck Pain
Possible causes include poor handlebar or saddle position. A poorly placed handlebar might be too low, at too great a reach, or at too short a reach. A saddle with excessive downward tilt can be a source of neck pain.
● Lower Back Pain
Possible causes include inflexible hamstrings, low cadence, using your quadriceps muscles too much in pedaling, poor back strength, and too-long or too-low handlebars.
● Hand Numbness or Pain
Possible causes are short-reach handlebars, poorly placed brake levers, and a downward tilt of the saddle.
●Numbness or Pain
Possible causes are using quadriceps muscles too much in pedaling, low cadence, faulty foot mechanics, and misaligned bicycle cleat for those who use clipless pedals.

III. Prevention of Injuries with Stretching & Exercising

●Warm up for 5 – 10 minutes with gentle movement. Stretch slowly and gradually. Also do some stretching after you ride
●Exhale as you gently stretch muscles. .Develop a stretching routine for the quadriceps, hamstrings, ilio-tibial band, piriformis and calves Also, do stretching for your neck, trunk, chest, wrists and hands.

●Hold stretches for 15 – 20 seconds; 2 – 3 repetitions

●Gradual resistive exercise for back musculature, abdominals, legs and arms

●Progress to closed chain exercises

●Progressive functional activities and agility skills

●Partial squats, step – ups and step – downs, lunges

●Proprioceptive training – balancing exercises

●Cross training: spinning, jogging, swimming

IV. Choosing a Correct Helmet

When you are choosing a helmet, fit is very important. For a helmet to protect you it must fit correctly. Other factors to know about a proper hat fit are:

●Make sure the helmet fits on the top of your head and does not tip backwards or forwards. It should be parallel to the ground. There should be about 2 fingers breadth between your eyebrow and the edge of the helmet
●The helmet should not move when you shake or move your head from side to side or up and down.
●Straps should always be fastened and fit snugly. It should also meet certain safety criteria. Look for “Snell Certified” or Meets ANSI Z904 Standard” on the box or on the helmet itself.
●There should be no cracks inside the helmet

Whether you are a beginning bicyclist or advanced rider and have and have an injury that is “holding you back from riding” our experienced and dedicated licensed physical therapists can help you get started. With Direct Access a prescription is not required to be evaluated. Contact Ivyrehab Briarcliff (914) 762 – 2222 and Ivyrehab Jefferson Valley (914) 245 – 8807 or visit our Website: www.ivyrehab.com to learn more about Direct Access.

Reference: www.apta.com

biking

biking

Fall is on its way! Are you ready?

Fall is coming and you know what that means! It’s time to hit the ground running. Literally and figuratively. It’s a busy time of year for everyone . . . especially families. It’s about coordinating schedules, getting kids back into the routine of heading to school every day, preparing for meetings, switching up your gym routines and restoring a sense of order back to life.

It doesn’t have to be a bummer and maybe even some of you can’t wait for the heat to break and the school bells to ring. We have some great things for kids that you might just love! Check out Breakfast Club Fit Kids at Club Fit Briarcliff. Drop off the kids at 7am and let them hang with us, work on homework, have breakfast or just chill out until the buses arrive! We’ll have movie nights and plenty of Parent’s Nights Out, so you’ll be able to relax while the kids are having fun! Keep an eye out for the School’s Out Camp Calendars too. That’s always a favorite during the school year! Of course we’ve always got your kids covered for various sports programs and swim lessons! Not to mention the awesome Swim Teams at each location! Our Jefferson Valley Swim Team deserves a special shout out for all their accomplishments last year!

For those of you who will mourn the Summer, don’t worry! Summer will be here again before you know it. Try to take advantage of the awesome Fall weather- take a hike with the Hiking Club, go for a run . . . maybe register for a Turkey Trot or any 5K! We’ll have a Paint Nite at Jefferson Valley on September 23rd that is sure to be a great time!

Be sure to look for the new Group Fitness Schedule, coming out on September 19th! There are so many great things to be excited about this Fall and we can’t wait to see you in the club!

Group four friends in helmets riding bikes on a forest path

Group four friends in helmets riding bikes on a forest path

Which Athletic Shoe Should I Buy?

Meryle Richman, PT, DPT, MS, CST, RYT
Senior Director at Ivyrehab Briarcliff and Ivyrehab Jefferson Valley

Buying an athletic shoe involves multiple considerations!

It is important to wear proper footwear to avoid ankle and foot pain or injury. Factors that should be considered in determining which shoe is right for you include:

The activities that will be performed, the construction of the shoe, what surfaces you will be on and the type of foot you have. Each sport or activity involves different movements or jumping and shoes are designed to fit the activity. Running, for instance, primarily involves movement in a straight line. Basketball and aerobics involve jumping and time spent on the forefoot. For example, playing tennis which involves side – to – side movements in a shoe with supports for straight movement could result in an ankle sprain. In addition, if you are involved in weight training activities for the lower extremities, wear different shoes than you use for impact sports. The extra weight from training compresses the cushioning and affects the shock absorption of the shoe. Cross trainers should only be used for short distance running (less than two miles). Some activities are similar so it may not be necessary to buy different shoes for each activity.

Uneven surfaces cause increased movement in the foot and ankle. This makes the ankle joint and the foot more vulnerable to injury. For example, running on rough terrain calls for an athletic shoe that is wider. This increases medial and lateral stability and decreases the risk for ankle injury.

Important tips to know before purchasing an athletic shoe:

● It is important to evaluate shoe construction prior to making a purchase

● Bend the shoe from toe to heel. It should not bend in places that your foot does not. In addition, if you push it down, it should not rock

● Place the shoes down and look at them from behind to assure the shoes are symmetrical

●You should also check wear patterns because this will tell you when to buy a new shoe

● There are 2 basic foot types: pronators and supinators:
(a) Pronator type foot is: limited big toe mobility, a heel that appears to turn out and the inner border appears to flatten when stepping. This type of foot requires a” motion control” athletic shoe. These shoes have firmer heels and a straight seam down the middle of the sole.

(b) Supinator type foot is: high and rigid arches and a heel that turns to the inside. This type of foot requires a shoe with more cushioning especially if you plan on using it for running. The sole of the shoe usually has a curved seam down the middle.

In summary, no two feet are alike even on the same person. However, by using basic guidelines, you can reduce the risk of injury.

For a free 10 minute screening, contact Ivyrehab Briarcliff at (914) 762 – 2222 or Ivyrehab Jefferson Valley at (914) 245 – 8807. With Direct Access a prescription is not required to be evaluated and treated. Visit our Website: www.ivyrehab.com to learn more about Direct Access.

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References:

1. Athletic Footwear and Orthoses in Sports Medicine – INDER https://www.google.com/search?q=D.G.+Sharnoff+Matthew+B.+Werd%2C+%E2%80%8EE.+Leslie+Knight+-+2010+-+%E2%80%8EMedical&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8

Fitness Success Story: Kathi Grossman

Kathi before and after

Kathi before, and how she looks today. Amazing progress on her fitness journey!

Kathi Grossman joined Club Fit in October of 2013 at the recommendation
of her doctors. Read how Club Fit has helped to impact her life and help her reach her fitness goals.

I have been morbidly obese all my life. I ended up with Type 2 diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, arthritis, and no cartilage in one of my knees. I was injecting insulin up to four times a day and taking numerous medications. I finally had enough! I had WLS (weight loss surgery) on September 22, 2011, and lost 210 pounds, which changed my life more than I ever could have imagined. Within hours of the WLS I was off all medications. I am still medication free, except for supplements. Having been obese all my life, as the weight came off, other issues arose. No core, no muscle tone, loose skin EVERYWHERE!! My doctor gave me a prescription to join Club Fit on the HelpRx program, which was the best thing that could have happened to me. Personal Trainer Russ was my first encounter with a trainer. I was pretty intimidated, but Russ took his time, listened to me and my physical limitations, and designed a routine just for me. This was the beginning — I started taking classes, and I mean everything, even things I thought I couldn’t do just to challenge myself. I started with Retro-Low, Low-impact Zumba, Kickboxing, Definitions, 4×4, Corebar, Spin, and Yoga. If they had a class I was there. I started to see where I fit and what I liked to do. This could have been overwhelming as exercise was NEVER a part of my life. Now I love to spin and weight train and do a few machines. The instructors were excellent and most helpful. There are so many wonderful people who have escorted me on my journey. There is, however, one person who stands out and that is General Manager Mark Cuatt. He took me under his wing and gave me a crash course in nutrition and then an exercise regimen for me to follow. He didn’t have to do that; he has enormous responsibilities running the club on a day-to-day basis. Nonetheless, we would meet at the gym, I would email him my food menus and things started to change again! This has not been an easy journey. I had a few setbacks but, to date, I have lost 250 pounds!! As I type the number it seems surreal.

I take advantage of most of the things Club Fit offers. I have a MYZONE belt, I use it always and should I forget it, I am lost. I do the FIT-3D scans, which help you see the transformation you are attaining. This experience would not have been as successful without the help of so many of the personal trainers, instructors and coaches. I wish I could name all of you, as you are all very special to me, because at one time you made it a point to help me with your time, advice or even a friendly “Hello!”. ALL of you have made an impact in changing NOT only my outward appearance but teaching me that being healthy is an everyday choice. Mark Cuatt told me once, I am always going to wage this battle in my head with my weight. Some days I’ll win and some days I’ll lose; but “never give up” is the moral of this story.

So I thank Club Fit for helping me find ME — the me I was meant to be. You have helped
to give a healthy me back to my husband, children and granddaughter. Hopefully I
will be around a long time still working out, and if I can inspire ONE person
through my story, then I have made a difference!

Better Balance Now

Better Balance Now!— Fall Prevention
Meryle Richman, PT, DPT, MS, CST, RYT

As we age the ability to maintain balance becomes more difficult. Many factors influence good balance, some of them are biological; and some we are able to influence and are able to improve. Balance and stability are important factors for aging adults to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Loss of balance is the primary factor in falls, which often results in serious injuries.

Good balance is dependent on sensory input form the eyes, the correct functioning of the balance system in the inner ear, posture and center of gravity and our ability to sense the position and movement in our feet, legs and arms. Vision affects the balance system, as the eyes send messages to the brain telling us where objects are in space.

Aging adults are affected by a loss of muscle mass and strength. This is associated with an increased risk of falls and hip fractures. It also has a great affect on maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Weakness in the ankle musculature may cause difficulty in recovering lost balance more quickly. Strong quadriceps muscles are necessary for good balance and walking. Evidence shows the strength and aerobic training can lead to a reduction in falls.

Loss of flexibility occurs with age. This may lead to difficulty climbing stairs, transferring from sit to stand and or getting out of bed without difficulty. Much of the loss of flexibility is due to inactivity. Flexibility exercises, stretches, gentle yoga will help improve flexibility of major muscle groups and therefore improve ones ability to complete everyday activities.

Postural changes develop as people age but not because they age. Rounded shoulders, forward head postures, increased thoracic curves in the spine are common postural changes. These changes affect the center of gravity in the body moving it forward. With changes in the center of gravity, older adults are more prone to loss of balance and an increased risk of falls.

Medications also contribute to the deterioration of the balance system. Research has shown that adding new medications in the previous two weeks increases the risk for falling.

There are many ways we can adapt to the changes in our bodies as we age. Some helpful tips include:

Promote safety in the home by using non-skid surfaces, eliminating area rugs & improve lighting in the home

  1. Get a yearly eye exam
  2. Proper nutrition and hydration
  3. Know the side effects of your medication
  4. Use caution with pets running around in your home
  5. Different forms of exercise, such as strengthening exercises, flexibility and stretches, postural exercise, yoga, tai chi, and aerobic exercise such as walking, will all contribute to decreasing the risk of falls and improve your balance.

Guidelines from The American College of Sports Medicine suggest that:

1) Healthy adults under the age of 65 should aim for:

 – Moderate intense cardiovascular exercises 30 minutes a day (aerobic exercise), five days a week or vigorous intense exercises 20 minutes a day, 3 days a week and strengthening-exercises twice a week

– Flexibility or stretching exercises are also recommended a minimum of 2-3 days a week

 2) Healthy adults 65 years or older:

 – Low-to-Moderate aerobic exercises, 30 minutes a day, 5 times a week and gentle strengthening-exercises (very light weights), 2- 3 times a week

– Flexibility or stretching exercises at a minimum of 2-3 times a week

Types of Aerobic and Low-to-Moderate Exercises:

Moderate Intense Aerobic Exercises Low-to-Moderate Aerobic Exercises
  • brisk walking
  • running
  • swimming
  • cycling; spinning classes
  • water exercises
  • gardening
  • housework
  • dancing, yoga, tai chi

If you want to determine your fitness level, refer to the reference guide from The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: http://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/everyone/measuring/index.html.

For beginners, you can simply start out by learning the basics of the talk test, which is a rule of thumb for doing moderate-intensity activity and you can still talk, but not sing during an activity. However, if you are doing a vigorous-activity you would want to learn how to find your target heart rate and determine what intensity range you should be exercising at for optimal cardiac performance.

Check out the Stay Healthy Website to determine a simple way to find your target heart rate at: www.cancer.org/healthy/toolsandcalculators/calculators/app/target-heart-rate-calculator. Once you find your target heart rate, wearing a heart rate monitor will make it easier to monitor your desired rate.

If you would like to improve your current level of fitness, but still have questions about how to begin a safe exercise program if you had an injury or illness, our experienced and dedicated licensed physical therapists can help you get started. With Direct Access a prescription is not required to be evaluated. Contact Ivyrehab Briarcliff (914) 762 – 2222 and Ivyrehab Jefferson Valley (914) 245 – 8807 or visit our Website: www.ivyrehab.com to learn more about Direct Access.

References:

(1) Exercise: Designing a Cardiac exercise Program. New York-Presbyterian Hospital. Retrieved September 2, 2011 from http://nyp.org/health/cardiac_exercis3.html

(2) American College of Sports Medicine Position Stand. Retrieved September 2, 2011 from http://www.mhhe.com/hper/nutrition/williams/student/appendix_i.pdf

Reduce Your Risk of Osteoporosis: Learn Preventative Exercise Tips

by Meryle Richman, PT, DPT, MS, CST, RYT
Ivy Rehab

Osteoporosis is a disease affecting approximately 10 million men and women in America. It is the progressive loss of bone mineral density. With bone loss over time the bones become weak and brittle leading to the increased likelihood of fractures, and bone deformation. The cost to our nation’s economy can be as much as 13 billion dollars per year in lost productivity and health care costs.

Who is at Risk for Osteoporosis?

Eighty percent of those with Osteoporosis are women. Women over 65 years of age are at much greater risk than men for Osteoporosis. Anyone diagnosed with Osteopenia, low bone density and a precursor to Osteoporosis is at greater risk. Other risk factors include women who are white or Asian, postmenopausal, cigarette smoking, sedentary lifestyle and some medication. Also women who have had long-term menstrual problems or have mineral absorption problems may also be at risk.

What can happen if you have Osteoporosis?

Osteoporosis causes a hunched forward posture and the formation of a hump, in the middle back and decreasing height. Poor posture and muscle tension due to the hunched posture can contribute to the increase of falling because the person’s center of gravity is shifted forward. Weak and brittle bones increase the likelihood of fracture during falls or fractures of the spine.

Some symptoms that may be caused by Osteoporosis include back pain, poor posture, lost height and decreased mobility. Anyone over 65 or postmenopausal women should be screened for osteoporosis even if symptoms are not present. Doctors will perform bone density scans to rate the persons bone density and determine their diagnosis based on that scan.

Tips on how Physical Therapy can help Osteoporosis:

1. Physical therapy can be utilized to manage to progression of Osteopenia, Osteoporosis and their symptoms. The patient’s goals include prevention of bone loss and increasing bone density.

2. According to the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), “The right exercises and good habits can keep bones strong and prevent or reverse the effects of osteoporosis. Weight-bearing exercise, such as walking, is an important way to build and maintain healthy bones. Muscle strengthening exercises have been found to stimulate bone growth and can help prevent and treat osteoporosis. These types of exercises are best if started early in life and done regularly. However, it is important to remember that you can begin exercising at any age and still reap great benefits”.

3. Avoid exercises and daily activities which round the spine, such as sit-ups, crunches, bending down to tie your shoes, certain exercise machines that involve forward bending of the trunk, and even movements and sports that round and twist the spine. Instead, hinge forward from your hips, while keeping your back straight.

4. Practice balance exercises (even at a wall or holding on) to reduce falls and resulting fractures. An individualized program may include a walking regimen, Tai Chi, yoga, Pilates and other exercises geared toward conditioning, balance, and coordination.

5. The APTA recommends: Using proper posture and safe body mechanics during all activities protects the spine against injury. Here are some tips:
– Keep your back, stomach, and leg muscles strong and flexible.
– Do not slouch.
– Use good body positioning at work, home, or during leisure activities.
– Ask for help when lifting heavy objects.
– Maintain a regular physical fitness regimen. Staying active can help to prevent injuries.

6. Always consult with your physician or physical therapist before beginning an exercise program, if you have osteoporosis, are at high risk for a fall, fracture, or have a medical condition that might affect your ability to exercise.

If you would like to be seen right away for learning how to set-up an exercise program, prevent an injury or chronic pain under Direct Access (no prescription is required), contact us at: www.ivyrehab.com.

Ivyrehab accepts most insurance plans (which our office obtains pre-approval from your insurance carrier) and will submit your office visit treatments for payment. You will be responsible for your co-payment depending on your particular insurance policy.
With one-on-one care this permits the therapist to construct a personalized program for the individual. After all, when it comes to rehabilitation, “it’s all about the people”.

References:
1. National OP foundation, www.nof.org/osteoporosis.
2. Meeks, Sara Walk Tall. Triad Publishing Company (FL); 1st edition (June 15, 1999).
3. Bassey E. Joan, Exercise for prevention of osteoporotic fracture. Age and Aging. Nov. 2001: 29-31.
4. Rahmani, Poupak, Morin, Suzanne. Prevention of osteoporosis-related fractures among post menopausal women and older men. CMAJ. 2009:181; 815-820.
5. American Physical Therapy Association, Bone Health.http://www.moveforwardpt.com/Resources/Detail/bone-health-2

To Keep You Inspired… Club Fit Instructor Lisa Coffman

by Lisa Olney, Club Fit guest blogger.

Lisa Coffman and her family

Club Fit instructor Lisa Coffman and her family of four.

For the last twenty years, Mahopac resident Lisa Coffman has helped the greater Club Fit community to reach their goals and overcome life’s challenges both in and out of the water. An aquatic exercise instructor, swim instructor and one of the assistant coaches for Club Fit’s swim team, Lisa has helped many members to strike back against potentially sidelining injuries and arthritis through aquatic exercise classes like H20 Waterwalking and Cardio Splash. She has helped members of all ages master the life skill of swimming both recreationally and competitively. Perhaps most impactful, she has also helped members overcome their fears of the water and learn to swim.

Lisa’s passion and loyalty to the Club Fit aquatics program has been a steadfast anchor over the years. These same qualities have also colored the pages of Lisa’s life from her childhood in the Dakotas and Minnesota to her career as a standout collegiate swimmer at Division III Cornell of Iowa where she swam the 50 meter butterfly at the NCAA Championships and then as a walk-on member of the Division I University of Minnesota Golden Gophers team. While in college she had her first taste of teaching people to swim, a feeling of reward and purpose that remains with her today. “One of the most rewarding aspects of what I do,” says Lisa, “is when I’m teaching somebody, and it just clicks.” Whether it’s in a class, in a swim lesson or on the swim team, Lisa has made a real difference to countless members of Club Fit.

Lisa brings this same passion and loyalty to her volunteer work as a member of the Yorktown Heights chapter of P.E.O. Founded in 1869, P.E.O. stands for Philanthropic Educational Organization. An international organization, P.E.O. has over 6,000 chapters in the U.S. and Canada and over 250,000 members. P.E.O. strives to increase women’s opportunities for higher education through scholarships, low-interest loans, grants, emergency funds and the Cottey College in Nevada, Missouri. In addition to supporting P.E.O. programs, the Yorktown Heights chapter donates funds to local organizations Guiding Eyes for the Blind, Friends of Karen, and Hope’s Door. They also sponsor local women for P.E.O. assistance and programs. To learn more about P.E.O. and the Yorktown Heights chapter visit www.peointernational.org.

Lisa has always led a busy life working at Club Fit, volunteering with P.E.O., and raising her family. She and her husband Paul have two children Paul, 28, and Stephanie, 25 — who works full time at Club Fit Jefferson Valley as the WSI coordinator, a swim instructor, and a swim coach. While Lisa has a full schedule, her goal is to log at least 30 minutes of exercise every day. Sometimes she’ll work out before her classes in the women’s section or on cardio in the fitness center. Some days it’s lap swimming, and some days it’s just walking outdoors and enjoying the fresh air. Lisa feels daily exercise in any form is important to keep physically and mentally healthy. “Get thirty minutes of something in every day,” says Lisa. “Whether it’s cardio, weights, or swimming, just do something.” From Nike’s “Just Do It” to the NFL’s “Play 60”, Lisa’s E-30 philosophy is something we can all strive to incorporate into our lifestyle.

To Keep You Inspired… Club Fit Instructor Harriette DeCarlo

by Lisa Olney, Club Fit guest blogger.

Club Fit Instructor Harriette DeCarlo

Club Fit Instructor Harriette DeCarlo

At 85 years young, Club Fit aquatic exercise instructor Harriette DeCarlo is an energetic powerhouse whose confident, welcoming handshake is indicative of the joie de vivre in which she lives her life. Always moving, always educating, Harriette leads those around her to a healthy body, a healthy mind and a healthy lifestyle.

A swimmer in high school, Harriette has always been an athlete — an avid runner, rower, and follower of Tai Chi, which she practiced at the Chuang Yen Monastery, a Buddhist monastery on 225 acres in Carmel, NY. But it wasn’t until joining Club Fit 30 years ago, that exercise truly became a part of her daily routine. Recognizing Harriette’s passion and knowledge of aquatic exercise and Tai Chi, Club Fit hired her two years later as an aquatics instructor, and she helped the club launch its first aquatic Tai Chi class in the 1990s. Since then Harriette has been enlightening members at Club Fit to the strengthening and restorative power of mind-body fitness in the water. Currently, Harriette teaches “Mind/Body Aquatics” on Tuesday mornings at 10:00 am. The class — a blend of yoga, Pilates, balance, and tai chi — is a full body workout integrating breathing, core strengthening, balance and relaxation.

So, how does Club Fit’s version of the Energizer Bunny keep going? “I can’t imagine a week without exercise,” says Harriette. “The Club is so much a part of my life that I don’t feel good if I’m not here.” Her routine at the club anchors her day, and she works out three to four days a week. On Tuesdays before her 10:00 am Mind/Body Aquatics class, she arrives at the gym around 7:00 am, and does her normal workout of cardio, weights, and stretching. Then she goes to the Café to meet with her longtime breakfast group of almost 20 years. Next, she heads to the Aquatic Center for her class, and then it’s back to the café to meet her lunch group, which has been meeting since she started teaching in 1988. Yes, her lunch group is 28 years old and an amazing testament to the friendships formed over the common bond of exercise, camaraderie and healthy lifestyles.

“I don’t think there’s a club in Westchester that compares to this,” says Harriette, “I will never give up Club Fit.” Harriette also feels the club is not afraid to lead, to take the initiative to do things that haven’t been done before — and not only in programming. “This is the only club I know that hires people with special needs,” Harriett says proudly. “I’ve never worked in a club that had the guts to do that — that took the initiative to do that.”

So, what’s next for Harriette? Rest assured, it will be more of the same with the current aquatic trend featuring yoga and Pilates — components she already integrates into her Mind/Body Aquatics class. And, rest assured, Harriette stands ready to welcome newcomers and regulars, alike, to Club FIt, the Aquatic Center, or even her breakfast and lunch groups, with her captivating smile and and that joie de vivre that make her not only an amazing instructor, but an amazing friend.

The importance of drinking water

Lemon

Lemon water is invigorating and detoxifying

Let’s talk about how good it is to stay hydrated! What does your body need? Water! After all, the adult human body is comprised of 60% water. More details about the water inside you can be found on the U.S. Geological Survey in this great article on water properties!

Did you know that you need different amounts of water depending on your lifestyle? The general recommendation for how much water an adult needs daily is 3 liters for men and 2.2 liters for women according to the Mayo Clinic. If you exercise you need more, if you are pregnant or nursing you need more. For a complete list of daily recommended amounts, click here.

You should never be thirsty. If you are, you are not hydrating enough. If you prefer drinking beverages that have more flavor, try adding some lemon to your water! Not only does it taste refreshing, but there are added benefits. Some of which include, cleansing your system, helping to keep your skin blemish free, added vitamin c and even gives your immune system a boost! More great benefits of drinking lemon water are right here on Lifehack.

Get yourself a nice water bottle (glass or metal is preferable) and start drinking water throughout the day! Hydrate and stay happy!

ACL: Injury, Treatment & Prevention

Come and meet Dr. Dhar and Brian McLean, DPT on April 28th at 6:30 PM inside the lobby of Club Fit Briarcliff. Attend the lecture from 7:00-8:00 PM (upper conference room).

ACL treatment with Dr. Yasmin Dhar

Dr. Yasmin Dhar will offer advice on treating ACL injuries

Collegiate and High School females are 9-10 times more likely to suffer a non-traumatic Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) injury than males in similar sports. This is the result of an anatomical increased angle at the knee in women, also known as a “Q” angle, which puts more pressure on the inside of the knee . However, according to Dr Yasmin Dhar, “It is more common to tear the ACL from a noncontact injury, like hyperextending or landing and twisting the knee, than a direct contact injury.”
Does a torn ACL have to be fixed with surgery?

From Dr. Yasmin Dhar’s experience with ACL tears, “The ACL cannot heal on its own, but not all tears of the ACL need surgery; treatment can depend on your activity level and amount of instability in your knee. People participating in sports or activities where they plant their feet, and twist or cut are susceptible to having an unstable knee and may be better off with surgery. Also if they are unable to modify their activities and desire an unrestricted lifestyle, they should consider surgery to have the best chance of returning to their pre-injury functional level. On the other hand, people who do not perform many cutting or pivoting activities, have no feeling of looseness in their knee, or lead a sedentary lifestyle may be able to function well with physical therapy to strengthen the leg, and possibly a brace. However, even sedentary people can experience giving way with simple activities such as going down stairs or stepping off a curb. When there is instability or giving way with simple life activities or sports, surgery is needed to restore normal kinematics and stability to the knee, preventing further damage to other structures in the knee.”

Come and learn more about ACL injuries and treatment options from Dr Dhar. www.YDharMD.com

Ways to Prevent and Minimize Knee Injuries

In order to prevent or minimize knee injuries, Brian McLean, DPT and Director at Ivyrehab Briarcliff will discuss the ACL Screening & Prevention Program that is currently being performed at Ivyrehab Briarcliff and Ivyrehab Jefferson Valley. By using a video analysis of the athlete’s knees in several positions of jumping (start position, before and after jumping), suggestions are made on the athlete’s exercise program, which is recommended to be done 3 times weekly for 6 weeks.

The ACL injury prevention program consists of an exercise program that includes: (1) warm-up exercises for maximum efficiency and conditioning, (2) integrating the components of ACL injury prevention for muscle and joint preparation with (3) combining flexibility and strengthening exercises and (4) plyometric exercises and agility drills that can facilitate a quick transition into practice activities.

Dr Yasmin Dhar is the Sports Medicine and Arthroscopic Surgery Specialist for Specialty Orthopedics in Harrison, New York. She completed her orthopaedic training at Westchester Medical Center, a level 1 trauma center, and her Sports Medicine fellowship at University of Pennsylvania. She is board-certified in orthopedic surgery as well as sports medicine. An avid athlete herself, her clinical practice focuses on the prevention and treatment of sports-related injuries of the shoulder, elbow, hip and knee.

She currently serves as the Chief of Sports Medicine at Montefiore New Rochelle Hospital, Assistant Clinical Professor of Orthopedic Surgery at New York Medical College, an affiliate physician for the LPGA tour, team physician for a number of local schools, and an Associate Master Instructor for the Arthroscopy Association of North America. http://www.ydharmd.com/

For additional information about attending this presentation please contact Ivyrehab Briarcliff at 914-762-2222.. You can also visit our website at www.ivyrehab.com.
Space is limited so call or stop in the register.

Ivy Rehab

To Keep You Inspired… Club Fit Member Luzmarina Lalli

by Lisa Olney, Club Fit guest blogger.

Luzmarina with her family

Club Fit Briarcliff member Luzmarina with her family.

They say exercise is medicine for your soul. And, if anyone doubts it, look no further than Club Fit Briarcliff member Luzmarina Lalli, wife, mother, grandmother, and warrior. Eternally young at heart, Luzmarina uses the Fitness Center, Group Fitness classes, and the Aquatics Center, with her hands-down favorite being Zumba classes. Sounds like a description that could fit many of Club Fit’s faithful members, however, there is a difference. Luzmarina is battling chronic kidney disease (CKD).

CKD is the gradual loss of kidney function over time. According to the National Library of Medicine, sometimes the loss of function can be so slow that you do not have symptoms until your kidneys have almost stopped working. Diagnosed in the 1990s, Luzmarina had no idea she was sick — no warning signs that her body was rebelling against her, until blood work at a routine trip to the doctor uncovered the disease. Doctors found none of the symptoms typically associated with kidney disease and urged her to keep up her healthy lifestyle. Luckily, a healthy lifestyle was routine for Luzmarina and her family. The only addition was check-ups to monitor her kidneys.

Luzmarina joined Club Fit 15 years ago and immediately found a place for her passion for dance in the group fitness classes. When Club Fit first started offering Zumba classes, Luzmarina was hooked, and she’s been sashaying her way across the Club Fit studio floors ever since. Her current routine is two to three Zumba classes a week, if her schedule allows, followed by a workout on the Hoist Strength Training Circuit. She’s just discovered the Aquatic Arthritis class and the post-class visit to the whirlpool that is not only medicine for the soul, but medicine for an arthritic knee.

20 years into her diagnosis, Luzmarina’s CKD has, unfortunately, progressed to an advanced stage. While she’s feeling better now, August through mid-December of 2015 was a struggle marked with fatigue. Still Luzmarina tried to make it to Club Fit for Zumba and strength training when she could, but it was difficult. “Sometimes I could hardly stay awake,” recalled Luzmarina. “In Zumba I was so slow, but it was great for my attitude to go and be able to feel that I accomplished something.” Though fatigued and sick, she was still able to maintain a high enough level of fitness to avoid dialysis. Her doctors at Columbia-Presbyterian in Manhattan want to keep it that way.

Luzmarina’s doctors have recommended pursuing a living donor kidney transplant before a deceased donor kidney transplant. According to Columbia University Medical Center’s Renal Transplant Program webpage “A deceased donor kidney has a 50/50 chance of functioning for 10-20 years, post-transplant. In contrast, a live donor kidney has a 50/50 chance of functioning over 20 years. In addition, 50-60% of deceased donor kidneys are fully functional immediately upon transplantation, versus 97% of live donor organs” (Deceased Donor Kidney Transplant, 2015.)

So, while her family and friends rally around her to help find a match, Luzmarina is back to her routine, maintaining her health and fitness, while inspiring everyone around her with her energy, positivity, and love of Zumba. When a match is found, one thing is for sure — our Zumba warrior will be ready.

To learn more about chronic kidney disease and kidney transplantation, visit the following websites:

Reference:

1) Chronic Kidney Disease. (2016, Jan.). Retrieved from:
https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000471.htm

2) Deceased Donor Kidney Transplant. (2015). Retrieved from: http://columbiasurgery.org/conditions-and-treatments/deceased-donor-kidney-transplant

Additional Source:

3) Transplantation: Living Donor Kidney Transplants. (2015). Retrieved from:
http://nyp.org/services/transplantation-surgery/kidney-transplant-living-donor.html

Club Fit Members Love MYZONE!

I love that when I am away I can now track my progress (with MYZONE). While it is great to have it tied to the gym and I love seeing it on the screen, I do go away for the summers and this allows me to keep up with my training in a consistent manner. And as we all know with fitness, consistency is key!

There are places in the gym where there are no MYZONE screens or they can’t be viewed (TRX room, certain spin bikes, the new ellipticals). I just realized today, I can just put my phone on and track my progress! So if I am bopping around on different machines/classes, I can continuously monitor myself.

— Club Fit Member Danielle O’Reilly

Learn how to prevent changes in balance for a fall-free future

Learn how to prevent changes in balance for a fall-free future.
Practice exercises to improve your balance!

Debbie Lenihan
PT Director
Physical Therapy at Jefferson Valley

As we age the ability to maintain balance becomes more difficult. Balance and stability are important factors for aging adults to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Loss of balance is the primary factor in falls, which often results in serious injuries.

Many factors influence good balance. Some of them are biological and some we are able to influence and improve. Good balance is dependent on sensory input from the eyes, the correct functioning of the balance system in the inner ear, posture and center of gravity, and our ability to sense the position and movement in our feet, legs and arms. Vision affects the balance system, as the eyes send messages to the brain, telling us where objects are in space.

Aging adults are affected by a loss of muscle mass and strength, and have an increased risk of falls and hip fractures. Weakness in the ankle musculature may cause difficulty in recovering lost balance more quickly. Strong quadriceps muscles are necessary for good balance and walking. Evidence shows that strength and aerobic training can lead to a reduction in falls.

Loss of flexibility occurs with age. This may lead to difficulty climbing stairs, transferring from sit to stand and/or getting out of bed without difficulty. Much of the loss of flexibility is due to inactivity.

Postural changes can develop as people age which includes rounded shoulders, forward head postures and an increased thoracic curve in the spine. These changes affect the center of gravity in the body, moving it forward. With changes in the center of gravity, older adults are more prone to loss of balance and an increased risk of falls.

There are many ways we can adapt to the changes in our bodies as we age. Different forms of exercise, such as strengthening exercises, flexibility and stretching exercises, yoga, tai chi, and aerobic exercise, such as walking, will all contribute to decreasing the risk of falls and improving balance.

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Join Physical Therapy at Club Fit Jefferson Valley for a free lecture: “Use it or Lose it” on March 31!

If you would like to attend this free presentation contact Physical Therapy at Jefferson Valley at (914) 245 – 8807 to reserve a seat. Space is limited to 10 participants.

Jimmy McDonough Cancer Foundation

[written by Club Fit blogger Lisa Skelton]

Jimmy McDonough Foundation founder Suzi McDonough

Jimmy McDonough Foundation founder Suzi McDonough

It takes a special person to take a family tragedy and turn it into a positive, but that’s just what Suzi McDonough did. When her husband, Jimmy, a longtime member of Club Fit Jefferson Valley, was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2004 and passed away less than a year later, Suzi and her family didn’t turn inward. They founded the Jimmy McDonough Foundation, a nonprofit that supports cancer patients and their families in the local community, and makes a big impact despite keeping a low profile.

“Our goal is to relieve as much stress as possible for families going through a cancer diagnosis and treatment,” says Suzi. “My family and I know firsthand the importance of a good support system, and want to provide that to those who don’t have the support they need.”

Her husband’s diagnosis was a surprise to everyone. Father of five, Jimmy never smoked and was focused on his fitness routine, working out at Club Fit almost every day. He was an involved and enthusiastic supporter of his community and kids’ sports in Mahopac, continuing to coach even after his diagnosis. He was being treated for pneumonia when a CT scan and subsequent biopsy revealed Stage 3 lung cancer. He passed away in February 2005, after seven months of chemotherapy and alternative treatments, but he and his family remained optimistic and positive throughout.

Since its inception, the Jimmy McDonough Foundation has helped countless people in our community. From rides to appointments to financial assistance to family outings, the Foundation supports families through their cancer journey. Family members serve on the Foundation’s board, and their single fundraiser is a golf outing held every May at Mahopac Golf Club. “One hundred percent of our fundraising proceeds go to funding our services,” says Suzi.

An additional fundraiser was held last year at FDR Park in Yorktown, a 5K Run that involved Club Fit’s Jason Needle, who is also battling cancer. “Jason is so like Jimmy with his positive attitude, and he is such an inspiration,” says Suzi. “His enthusiasm during the 5K event reminded me of Jimmy’s optimism throughout our family’s ordeal.”

Suzi has kept herself busy in the years since Jimmy’s passing, not only with the Foundation, but as Town Councilwoman in Carmel. She also works for the State Senate, and enjoys spending time with her five now-grown children. “I have a choice,” says Suzi. “I can wilt away or look ahead.”

But the Jimmy McDonough Foundation is clearly her priority. “Through the work we do, Jimmy’s legacy will live on,” says Suzi. And Club Fit Jefferson Valley is jumping on the bandwagon, donating all proceeds raised at the club’s Open House on January 31 to the Foundation. With a $50 donation, attendees received raffle tickets for prizes including massages, tennis lessons, a week of summer camp, a big screen TV, etc. A win-win for everyone! If you couldn’t make it and would like to help Suzi and her family make a difference in the lives of cancer patients in your community, you can mail your donation to The Jimmy McDonough Foundation, 72 Lockwood Lane, Mahopac, NY 10541, and know that you helped brighten someone’s day!

A Winter Fitness Boost!

By Liza Forster, RYT
Group Fitness Manager
Club Fit Jefferson Valley

Has Old Man Winter got you grounded? Being confined to home because of winter weather doesn’t need to put a cramp in your fitness routine. In fact, changing up how and where you exercise can actually give you an unexpected fitness boost.

First of all, remember that you don’t have to do everything all at once. 10 minute “legs” or intervals of exercise lets you crosstrain and keep you interested and more likely to push your own personal envelope. Three or four of these and you’ve exercised for 30 or 40 highly respectable minutes by the end of your day. Plus, jumping from isometrics, to endurance to strength work, etc, will keep your body and heart out of it’s comfortable routine, and out of it’s comfort zone. Combine the following as you like. Get your kids off of the laptops and make it a competition.

Ropeless jumproping- Put on your favorite music, and jump, jump, jump. One minute interval, 30 seconds of rest, repeat until you are at ten minutes total. Fast jump, joggy jump, skipping jump. Not only is jumping great cardio, but the impact lays bone on bone, increasing bone density. If you have bone issues, land lightly. Stepping in place is a safe alternative for delicate, more fragile bones.

Plank – Nothing like a straight arm plank to build some super strength. This one isn’t just for fighting the winter blues. Make this part of a daily practice all year round. Start at 30 seconds, and you progress, rock a 90 second plank. Pull your belly button firmly into your spine and keep it there. Wrists under shoulders, knees under hips. Can you say arms to die for?

Bicycle – Your grade school gym teacher got this right. Bicycle is a game changer. Back to one minute intervals on your back, 30 seconds rest in between. Alternate the work, fast bicycle for the first one, then S-L-O-W it way way down. Third one normal speed but hold the the elbow to the opposite knee as you cross, stay out of your comfort zone Keep your lower back flat on the ground.

Prisoner Squats – Nothing like squats to cut and define the glutes, quads, and hams. Lace fingers behind neck, elbows pulled back. Take a wide stance with feet parallel. Sit back into an imaginary chair, keeping knees over ankles and elbows pulled back. Up slowly and repeat. Exhale on the descend, inhale up and keep it slow. 4-6 rounds of 45 seconds with 30 seconds rest in between.

Wall handstand. Take a down dog (facing away from wall) with heels against a bare wall. Look in between hands at the floor. Walk your feet up the wall so that your legs are at a right angle from the wall. Hold for thirty seconds and walk down. As you progress, walk legs farther up so body is straight and almost perpendicular to the wall.

Repeat the series, and switch it up as needed throughout your snow day. Don’t forget to stretch everything out. 10 long breaths in a beautiful down dog hits the entire back of the body, sink into those heels, bend knees if you have any back pain. Don’t forget to shovel and have a snowball fight!
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Breast Cancer Wellness

— written by Club Fit Member and Guest Blogger Lisa Skelton

 

Memorial Sloan-Kettering’s Dr. Sandra Brennan supports utilizing physical activity to help combat breast cancer.

Dr. Sandra Brennan, radiologist & breast cancer specialist

Club Fit member Dr. Sandra Brennan, Director of Breast Imaging and Interim Director of Radiology at the West Harrison outpost of New York’s Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.

Dr. Sandra Brennan may be new to Club Fit, but the benefits of a healthy lifestyle, for both her patients and herself, is not new at all. Dr. Brennan is Director of Breast Imaging and Interim Director of Radiology at the new West Harrison outpost of New York’s Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, a long-anticipated and welcomed resource for Westchester County’s cancer patients.

Hailing from Ireland, where she attended University College Dublin and completed her residency at Mater Misericordiae Hospital, also in Dublin, Dr. Brennan came to the United States in 2005 to complete a fellowship at Sloan-Kettering’s Breast and Body Imaging Center, and the rest was history. During the fellowship, she sharpened her expertise in imaging of tumors in the chest, abdomen and pelvis, as well as in breast imaging and intervention, and upon completion of the fellowship she was invited to join the faculty in Sloan-Kettering’s Department of Radiology.

Currently, her focus is on breast imaging, which involves interpretation of screening and diagnostic mammograms, ultrasound examinations and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Her clinical work includes state-of-the-art procedures such as image-guided biopsy under stereotactic, ultrasound and MRI guidance, and breast localization procedures with both radioactive seed and wire localizations. Radioactive seed localizations are a relatively new approach that she says will be put into practice in MSK West Harrison in the new year. “The field is constantly evolving, and the number of options available to our patients continues to grow,” she says.

The opening of the West Harrison facility was a great opportunity for Dr. Brennan, who is also mom to six-year-old Samuel and four-year-old Leah, to get out of the city and into the more family-friendly suburbs. The family recently moved to Chappaqua and joined Club Fit Briarcliff, where they enjoy the Aquatics Center on weekends, and Samuel has been playing basketball. Dr. Brennan is no stranger to health clubs, and staying fit has been a lifelong practice. “I run, cycle, hike, swim…I’ve even completed some half-marathons!” she said. Since joining Club Fit, she gets in two to three visits per week, and has been spending her time in the Fitness Center. She’s looking forward to exploring other areas of the club with her children in the coming months.

One program that piqued her interest was the Cancer Wellness Program, which has been a part of Club Fit’s programming for a number of years. Free to cancer patients, both members and non-members, this strength and cardio conditioning program is designed to meet the special needs of people undergoing and recovering from cancer treatment. “There is growing evidence to suggest that maintaining a healthy weight and being physically active may reduce your risk of getting certain types of cancer such as breast, colon, endometrial and prostate,” says Dr. Brennan. “Patients who exercise and pay attention to their overall wellness tolerate treatment better, and in many cases experience a faster recovery.”

With the opening of the West Harrison facility, Sloan-Kettering has expanded its presence in Westchester County, which it has served since 1995 through its facility at Phelps Memorial Hospital in Sleepy Hollow. The facility’s staff includes more than 100 professionals, including cancer surgeons, medical and radiation oncologists and radiologists. “What we’ve done is bring all the services of the main campus in Manhattan to Westchester, allowing patients access to the same high-quality services without the commute into the city,” says Dr. Brennan. Add that to the plethora of support groups and other resources available to cancer patients in our area, and a cancer diagnosis becomes a much easier burden to bear, for both patient and caregiver.

Click here for more information on Sloan-Kettering’s West Harrison facility, as well as Dr. Brennan and her colleagues. You can also click here to find out more about Club Fit’s Cancer Wellness Program, a valuable resource to anyone fighting the battle against cancer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Physical Therapy at Briarcliff Welcomes Back Lynn Culbertson, DPT!

Lynn Culbertson, DPT

Lynn Culbertson, DPT

Here’s what Lynn has to say, “I am so glad to be back at Physical Therapy at Briarcliff located inside Club Fit. The staff is always so warm and welcoming. It has been a long road back and along the way I have acquired many skills that I am excited to share with the entire Club Fit community.

My career as a Physical Therapist and Yoga Instructor has inspired me to study Women’s Health Physical Therapy and Osteopathic techniques. As a Women’s Health Physical Therapist, I am able to provide women help and treatment with a variety of musculoskeletal disorders of the pelvic region. Conditions that are often difficult to treat and even to discuss include chronic pelvic pain, sexual pain and dysfunction; and incontinence. Some of these pain conditions severely interfere with a patient’s entire life and cause problems with work, relationships and self-esteem. However, with treatment, these conditions can be helped and a patient can return to a normal daily life.

In addition to my love for Yoga; knowledge of energy systems, mindfulness and each individual’s ability to heal from within, this has inspired me to learn and incorporate Osteopathic techniques with my patients. These techniques include: 1) Visceral manipulation, which helps improve the organ’s mobility by using a very gentle pressure to the organ being treated, and allows the body to function more efficiently; 2) Craniosacral therapy for balancing the nervous system and to reduce chronic pain and relieve tension caused by stress or chronic medical conditions; 3) Myofascial Release techniques which work gently on the fascial tissues of the body; and allow for subtle areas of tightness or restrictions in the body to release; and 4) Reiki techniques to balance the body’s energy imbalances and restore positive energy back into the body. This is accomplished by utilizing “zero balancing” to energize or relax the patient depending on what the patient needs at each session.

These techniques have been shown in studies to improve bowel and bladder dysfunction and decrease musculoskeletal pain. I work strictly on the “Whole” person approach to Physical Therapy, finding where the dysfunction is coming from. Whether you come to me for knee pain, back pain or pelvic dysfunction your story and your body leads to your healing.”

For more information and to schedule an appointment please call Physical Therapy at Briarcliff (914) 762 – 2222. www.ptrehab.com. Most Insurance plans accepted.

Five things you can do to help prevent childhood obesity

habits begin early

habits begin early

Did you know that one in five children is overweight or obese by age 6?
You can help.

As parents, your role as a mentor and educator for your child are essential influencers in their lives. Help them learn habits that prevent childhood obesity and can keep them healthy for life.

Focus on a few goals:

1. Physical Activity: Provide 1-2 hours of physical activity throughout the day, including outside play when possible.
2. Screen Time: Try and limit screen time to no more than 30 minutes per day.
3. Food: Incorporate fruits or vegetables at every meal and eat foods closest to the original form
Ex> potato instead of mashed potatoes, or potato chips.
4. Beverages: Provide access to water during meals and throughout the day, and don’t serve sugary drinks. For children age 2 and older, serve low-fat (1%) or non-fat milk, and no more than one 4- to 6-ounce serving of 100% juice per day.
5). Sleep: Be sure children get adequate sleep. It is essential for proper functioning. At least 8 hrs. Per night.

If you are looking to get your children involved in sports, fitness and other great activities that will keep them active, visit Programs for infants, kids and teens at Club Fit Jefferson Valley and Programs for infants, kids and teens at Club Fit Briarcliff for information on some of the things we offer.

Just how important are our habits?

A recent viral video, “Rewind the Future”, has inspired us to write about the importance of healthy habits from the beginning of life.
We asked Fitness Director, Susie Reiner to share some thoughts with us and this is what she had to say . . .

“This video is a stark reminder of the importance of embracing a healthy lifestyle not just for ourselves but for the people we care for in our day to day life. Wellness is a lifelong commitment to maintaining and improving the human body and in essence, its resilience to aging. In most instances, we are responsible for our own health and sooner or later succumb to the facts that a well-balanced diet and regular physical activity enhances our lives more than indulgent food and sedentary habits. When bringing children into the world, as this video depicts, it is a slippery slope to letting unhealthy habits reign supreme in a child’s life. It is the parent, guardian, schools, community, and youth programs’ responsibility to establish a healthy environment for children to flourish in. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention states that more than one third of the United States’ population is obese and the chances of an adult being overweight or obese is greatly influenced by the behavioral habits instilled with them as a child and adolescent. We have the power in our own lifetime to change the quality of life for the next generation through consistent efforts to support a healthy lifestyle. Including fitness and lifestyle activities in a child’s life and developing a healthy relationship with wholesome food is crucial at an early age. And remember, it is never too late to make a change; health complications can be prevented by taking small steps to a longer future.”