Bike Right, Bike Fit

by Meryle Richman, PT, DPT, MS, CST, RYT

With the beginning of fall and changing of the leaves, people enjoy being outdoors riding their bicycles. The physical therapists at Ivyrehab can teach you preventative measures to avoid bike injuries.

For the average bike rider cycling involves a limited repetitive motion. At an average cadence of 90 revolutions per minute (RPM), a bicycle rider cranks out 5,400 strokes each hour. This becomes 1.5 million strokes in 5,000 miles. So you can just imagine how this can lead to a lot of wear and tear on the cartilage, ligaments and joints of the knee.

I. What you need to know about for a proper Bike Fitting:

The most common bike fitting errors include a saddle that is too high or too low, excessive handlebar reach that causes you to lean too far forward, and improper alignment of the pedal and shoe.

The American Physical Therapy Association recommends that when evaluating a cyclist for a proper bike fit the following assessment be performed:

●Foot to Pedal: The ball of the foot should be over the pedal spindle (the bar in the middle of the pedal on which the pedal “spins”). For cleat users, it is important to establish a neutral position of the cleat on the shoe. This will allow for neutral tracking of the knee through the pedal stroke.

●Saddle and Knee/Pedal Position: Saddle height should allow the knee to be slightly bent at the most extended portion of the pedal stroke. A suggested knee angle at dead-bottom-center is 30- 35 degrees while the foot is in the pedaling position.

●Saddle tilt: Saddle tilt for normal-endurance bicycling should be level. Pay close attention to the portion of the saddle that will be supporting the ischial tuberosities, or “sitting bones.” Cut out saddles allow for better tissue oxygenation. A well-fit saddle will provide the best comfort and results.

●Saddle Position in relation to the handlebars: Saddle position should allow the knee to be over the foot (metatarsal heads, ball of foot) at the 3-o’clock position of the bicycle crank-arm. The foot should be in a normal pedaling position.

●Handlebars: The position of the handlebars will affect the comfort of the hands, shoulders, neck and back, as well as the overall handling of the bicycle. For the Recreational Rider the trunk angle (trunk from horizontal reference line) should be angled between 40-80 degrees, and the shoulder angle (trunk to humerus) should be between 80 and 90 degrees. The handlebar position, should allow the hands to be slightly wider than the shoulder width. This is for comfort of the hands, arms and shoulders. For the Road Rider the trunk angle (trunk from horizontal reference) should be between 30 and 40 degrees, and the shoulder angle (trunk to humerus) should be between 90 and 100 degrees. The handlebar position should be approximately 2 centimeters (or .79 inches) wider than shoulder width for comfort of the hands, arms and shoulders.

Screen Shot 2016-08-24 at 10.21.58 AM

The ideal position of the knee in pedaling is to have the knee over the pedal and ball of the foot at the 3 o’clock position.

II. Common Overuse Injuries with Biking

● liotibial Band Syndrome (IT Band):

Possible causes are too-high saddle, leg length difference, and misaligned bicycle cleat for those who use clipless pedals. Pain is caused when the band becomes tight and rubs over the bony prominences of the hip (greater trochanter) and/or the knee (lateral epicondyle). When the knee is flexed at 30 degrees and is at the bottom of the stroke motion, there is friction on the tendon attachment. Tight inflexible lower extremity muscles may also worsen the condition. The band becomes tight and pulls at the hip and knee causing pain. In order to minimize knee and hip pain, it is important to pedal with low resistance and keep the cadence at 80-90 rpm.

● Chondromalacia:
Another common knee injury is anterior knee pain, such as chondromalacia. This involves irritation of the cartilage behind the patellar and patellar femoral tracking of the knee. If there is a muscle imbalance of the muscles of the anterior thigh known as the quadriceps, the outside muscle (vastus lateralis obliqus) becomes tight and the muscle on the inside of the thigh (vastus medialis obliqus) becomes weak. This results in lateral movement of the patellar which does not “track” smoothly in the patellar groove and results in irritation to the patellar (patellar-femoral maltracking) and anterior knee pain.

● Hamstring Tendinitis
Possible causes are inflexible hamstrings, high saddle, misaligned bicycle cleat for those who use clipless pedals, and poor hamstring strength.
● Neck Pain
Possible causes include poor handlebar or saddle position. A poorly placed handlebar might be too low, at too great a reach, or at too short a reach. A saddle with excessive downward tilt can be a source of neck pain.
● Lower Back Pain
Possible causes include inflexible hamstrings, low cadence, using your quadriceps muscles too much in pedaling, poor back strength, and too-long or too-low handlebars.
● Hand Numbness or Pain
Possible causes are short-reach handlebars, poorly placed brake levers, and a downward tilt of the saddle.
●Numbness or Pain
Possible causes are using quadriceps muscles too much in pedaling, low cadence, faulty foot mechanics, and misaligned bicycle cleat for those who use clipless pedals.

III. Prevention of Injuries with Stretching & Exercising

●Warm up for 5 – 10 minutes with gentle movement. Stretch slowly and gradually. Also do some stretching after you ride
●Exhale as you gently stretch muscles. .Develop a stretching routine for the quadriceps, hamstrings, ilio-tibial band, piriformis and calves Also, do stretching for your neck, trunk, chest, wrists and hands.

●Hold stretches for 15 – 20 seconds; 2 – 3 repetitions

●Gradual resistive exercise for back musculature, abdominals, legs and arms

●Progress to closed chain exercises

●Progressive functional activities and agility skills

●Partial squats, step – ups and step – downs, lunges

●Proprioceptive training – balancing exercises

●Cross training: spinning, jogging, swimming

IV. Choosing a Correct Helmet

When you are choosing a helmet, fit is very important. For a helmet to protect you it must fit correctly. Other factors to know about a proper hat fit are:

●Make sure the helmet fits on the top of your head and does not tip backwards or forwards. It should be parallel to the ground. There should be about 2 fingers breadth between your eyebrow and the edge of the helmet
●The helmet should not move when you shake or move your head from side to side or up and down.
●Straps should always be fastened and fit snugly. It should also meet certain safety criteria. Look for “Snell Certified” or Meets ANSI Z904 Standard” on the box or on the helmet itself.
●There should be no cracks inside the helmet

Whether you are a beginning bicyclist or advanced rider and have and have an injury that is “holding you back from riding” our experienced and dedicated licensed physical therapists can help you get started. With Direct Access a prescription is not required to be evaluated. Contact Ivyrehab Briarcliff (914) 762 – 2222 and Ivyrehab Jefferson Valley (914) 245 – 8807 or visit our Website: www.ivyrehab.com to learn more about Direct Access.

Reference: www.apta.com

biking

biking

Prevention Tips for Soccer Injuries

By Meryle Richman, PT, DPT, Senior Director at Ivyrehab Briarcliff & Jefferson Valley

Youth soccer injuries (ages 2 to 18) suffer around 120,000 injuries each year which are serious enough to require a trip to a hospital emergency room. The total number of soccer-related injuries, including those treated outside of a hospital ER, is estimated to be nearly 500,000 per year.A significant number of these injuries could be prevented if parents, athletes and soccer organizations employed the following safety measures:

Reduce injuries through proper strengthening and conditioning exercises, (especially building up hamstrings and inner quadriceps muscles) and teaching girls to pivot, jump, and land with flexed knees and employ a three-step with the knee flexed instead of a one-step stop with the knee extended have been shown to prevent some of these injuries. Stretching, particularly of the groin, hip, hamstrings, Achilles tendon, and quadriceps, during warm-ups before practices and games and during the cool-down after playing, is particularly vital in reducing the risk of strains and sprains.

To further reduce injuries properly maintaining the field, wear proper shin guards, and reduce injuries from goal post collisions with padding.

Stretching Tips:

Perform 3 repetitions of each stretch and hold 20-30 seconds

●Two Leg Hamstring Stretch
1. With both feet together and legs fully extended, hinge forward from your hips and reach forward with both hands towards your toes.
2. Tuck your chin towards your chest to increase the stretch. 3. Keep your toes pointed towards the sky.

●Hamstring Split Stretch
1. Bending on one knee, extend the other leg out in front of you.
2. Reach with both hands towards your outstretched foot.
3. Keep your toes towards the sky and tuck your head to increase the stretch. Remember to breathe!
4. Repeat for the opposite side.

●Lying Quadriceps Stretch
1. Lying on one side grasp your ankle and pull your heel towards your buttocks.
2. Keep your back straight and the other leg bent.
3. Do not grab your foot. Grab just above the ankle joint (the bottom of your leg).
4. Keep the thigh in line with your body. To increase the stretch push your hips forward (only a slight movement).
5. Repeat for the opposite side.

●Standing Groin Stretch
1. Stand with your legs wider than shoulder width apart.
2. Shift your weight onto one side as you bend your knee.
3. Reach with one hand towards your outstretched foot.
4. You should feel the stretch right down the inside of your outstretched leg.
5. Repeat for the opposite side.

●Sitting Groin Stretch
1. Sit with knees bent at 90 degrees.
2. Place the soles of your feet together to ‘splay’ your knees outwards.
3. Gently use your hands or elbows to push your knees downwards

●Lower Back Stretch
1. Sit with the legs straight out in front of you.
2. Bend the right knee so the sole of your foot is flat on the ground.
3. Turn your upper body towards your right knee and place your right hand on the floor for support
4. Place your left forearm on the outside of your right knee and gently pull your knee towards you
5. Resist with your knee and left hand to feel the tension in your lower back.
Repeat for the opposite side.

●Standing Calf Stretch
1. Using a wall or bar to support you, place one leg outstretched behind you.
2. Keeping the other leg bent lean against the wall to apply pressure to your beg leg.
3. Make sure you keep your back heel flat on the ground.
4. Repeat for the opposite side.

●Chest & Back Stretch
1. This stretch can be performed kneeling or standing. Take your boots off if you kneel.
2. Clasp your hands behind your back, keeping your arms as straight as possible.
3. Try to straighten your arms and raise them.
4. From this position bend forward from the waist also tucking your head towards your chest.
5. Hold this position for the recommended amount of time.

● Shoulder Stretch
1. Place one are outstretched across your chest.
2. Place the hand or forearm of your other arm on your outstretched elbow to apply pressure.
3. Gently pull your outstretched arm closer to your chest, keeping it as straight as possible.

Call to set up a free appointment if you would like to attend this free Soccer Screening at Ivyrehab Jefferson Valley (914) 245-8807 on March 16, 2016 from 8:15-8:45 PM. In addition, if you would like to be seen right away for an injury or chronic pain under Direct Access (no prescription is required), contact us at or Ivyrehab Jefferson Valley (914) 245-8807 or Ivyrehab Briarcliff at (914) 762-2222. You can also visit our website at: www.ivyrehab.com.

Ivyrehab accepts most insurance plans (which our office obtains pre-approval from your insurance carrier) and will submit your office visit treatments for payment. You will be responsible for your co-payment depending on your particular insurance policy.

With one-on-one care this permits the therapist to construct a personalized program for the individual. After all, when it comes to rehabilitation, “it’s all about the people”.

Reference:
http://www.momsteam.com/sports/soccer/ten-ways-to-reduce-or-prevent-soccer-injuries

Free Soccer Injury Prevention Screening
March 16, 2016 from 8:15-8:45 PM with Jacek Golis
inside Ivyrehab Jefferson Valley
(Located inside Club Fit Jefferson Valley)

Ivy Rehab

Prevention Tips for Tennis Injuries

By Meryle Richman, PT, DPT, MS, Senior Director at Ivyrehab Briarcliff & Jefferson Valley

Tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis) typically affects middle aged (40 to 60 years of age) adults and only 1 in 20 play tennis. If you have pain and/tenderness on the inside of your elbow, that is not going away it could be caused by different reasons such as improper techniques, poor physical conditioning, weight of the tennis racquet, too much tension on the strings of the racquet, balls are too heavy, type of court surface you are playing on and the grip size of the racquet. Other causes for lateral epicondylitis come from repeated forcible extension of the wrist such as using a screwdriver, heavy lifting and shoveling snow. Overuse of the muscles that extend the wrist usually has no pain at rest, but will increase with activity.

Treatment of tennis elbow focuses on relieving pain, controlling inflammation, promoting healing, improving local and general fitness and controlling force loads and repetitive movements with the wrists. Physical therapy uses a variety of modalities to relieve pain and decrease inflammation, massage and soft tissue mobilization techniques to heal the tissues. In addition, the following stretching and exercises are also recommended:

NOTE: the recommended stretching and exercises should not cause any increase pain. In the event that they do, you should stop immediately and consult with your physician.

Stretching Tips

Forearm stretch:
Hold arm straight out, fingers pointed towards the floor. Use your opposite hand and pull the fingers towards the body until a stretch is felt. Hold 10 seconds, repeat 3 times.
Repeat same as above, but fingers are pointed towards the ceiling. Use the opposite hand to fingers towards you. Hold 10 seconds, repeat 3 times.

Racquet stretch:
Stand with your feet shoulder width apart. Hold your racquet at the top of its frame with the right hand behind your head. Grasp the grip of the racquet with the left hand and slowly pull the racquet down the back. Hold 15 – 20 seconds. Repeat 3 times. Switch hands and do in the opposite direction

Scapular Stretch:
Cross the right arm in front of the left shoulder letting the elbow bend so that the hand droops over the left shoulder. With the left hand on the right elbow, push your arm in towards the back of the room. Hold for 15 – 20 seconds. Repeat 3 times.

Arm overhead stretch:
Take your left hand over your head. Bend it at the elbow, so that your left hand is over your head near your right ear. Then take the right hand and push the left elbow with it more toward the right. Hold for 15 – 20 seconds. Repeat 3 times

Hands behind the back stretch:
Grasp your hands behind your back while holding them at the wrist. Pull your left hand more towards the right and then do in the opposite direction. Hold 10 – 15 seconds. Repeat 2 -3 times

Recommended Strengthening Exercises

Ball Gripping: Use a soft ball and repetitively squeeze to strengthen the forearm muscles. Do 100 – 200 times a day.

Wrist curls: Support your forearm on a table and stabilize your wrist with your other hand. Hold a 1 – 2 pound weight and bring your wrist up toward the ceiling and then back down. Now turn your palm up and once again bend your wrist toward the ceiling. Do 10 times/ 3 sets. Increase in 1/2 pound increments.

Broom – Handle Exercise: Take a stick and hang a 1 – 2 pound weight from a string to the stick. Keep the arms held out in front, with the palms down and attempt to roll the weight up and then back down. Repeat with palms up. Do 10 times/3 sets.

Call to set up a free appointment if you would like to attend this free Tennis Screening at Ivyrehab Jefferson Valley (914) 245-8807 on February 23, 2016 from 7:15-7:45 PM. In addition, if you would like to be seen right away for an injury or chronic pain under Direct Access (no prescription is required), contact us at or Ivyrehab Jefferson Valley (914) 245-8807 or Ivyrehab Briarcliff at (914) 762-2222. You can also visit our website at www.ivyrehab.com.

Ivyrehab accepts most insurance plans (which our office obtains pre-approval from your insurance carrier) and will submit your office visit treatments for payment. You will be responsible for your co-payment depending on your particular insurance policy.

With one-on-one care this permits the therapist to construct a personalized program for the individual. After all, when it comes to rehabilitation, “it’s all about the people”.


Free Sport Readiness and Injury Prevention Screening
Location: Inside Ivyrehab Jefferson Valley
February 23, 2016 at 7:15 -7:45 PM with Deborah Cohen, MSPT

Ivy Rehab

Prevention of Golf-Related Injuries

Meryle Richman, PT, DPT, MS, Senior Director of Ivyrehab Briarcliff and Jefferson Valley

“Golf is a game now enjoyed by over 29.3 million golfers of all ages, shapes, and levels of physical fitness”. Although most people would agree that golf is not a rigorous sport, there is a wide range of musculoskeletal ailments associated with the full golf swing. Contrary to the slow nature of the game, the explosive action of the full swing places significant stress on shoulder, elbow, and wrist joints as well as producing high torque forces on the low back and hip structures.

Golfers of all levels could benefit from an effective golf-training program that serves a dual purpose of improving performance and reducing the risk for injury. Golfers have learned that it is much easier to make a mechanically correct swing when the body is strong and flexible. Golf fitness should include three major components: (1) maintaining and improving flexibility, (2) improving golf specific strength, and (3) improving postural balance and stability.

Flexibility & Strengthening Exercises:

Pre-season is a good time to begin a generalized stretching and strengthening program for your neck, back and extremities. For example, increasing joint flexibility can lengthen your swing; thus increasing the club head speed and result in longer shots. Increasing golf specific muscle strength requires an integrated, multi-joint strengthening program to allow for coordinated actions of major muscle groups of different body segments. The golf swing can also inherently create postural imbalances, which can lead to injury.

The most common injuries are discussed with stretching and exercise tips can help to prevent or reduce pain and/or injuries resulting from the repetitive nature of the golf swing coupled with the high velocity forces:

(1) Medial epicondylitis, or “golfer’s elbow”:
This ailment involves increased inflammation and pain on the inside of the right elbow (for right-handed golfers). Exercise Tip: A proper conditioning program will include wrist flexion/extension and supination/pronation (rotation of wrist clockwise and counter-clockwise) strengthening and stretching.

(2) Shoulder tendonitis, or “rotator cuff tendonitis”:

This can be a chronic problem for those with tight shoulder internal/external rotators and weak shoulder girdle stabilizers. Exercise Tip: The golfer who has concentrated his efforts in developing maximum strength and flexibility of the levator scapulae, rhomboids, sternocleidomastoid, rotator cuff muscles, and trapezius muscles will enjoy the greatest success.

(3) Low back pain:
This can affect most golfers at one time or another. The golf swing combines “unnatural” spinal movements of bending forward, bending backward, bending sideways, and rotating. Exercise Tip: A preventative-conditioning program will incorporate multi-directional stretching and strengthening 2-3 times a week with an 8-minute warm-up routine before playing. For example, a before round warm-up exercise routine would include knee to chest, modified squats, back extensions, shoulder stretch, and low back/neck rotations and sidebands. All exercises would be done in sets of five performed in a smooth, controlled manner.

(4) Neck Pain:
One important aspect often overlooked when striving for the pain free neck is unrestricted cervical spine rotation. The ability to “retract” your neck (or slightly tucking your chin) and fully rotate your chin to the left is necessary to achieve a good “top of back swing position” (for the right-handed golfer). Any limitation in flexibility in either plane of motion can cause muscle strain/or nerve pinching. The shearing and rotational stresses occurring at the lower neck at the top of backswing will be minimized with good muscle flexibility. Exercise Tip: Gentle rotation and side bending neck stretches done two times daily for duration of twenty seconds each will help eliminate pain and restriction.

Another reason for neck pain is mechanical in nature, often caused by overstretching of ligaments due to postural stresses. The golfer who spends countless hours practicing with the head in a forward, protruded position will always be at high risk to develop cervical (neck) pain. The walker versus the cart rider has far greater neck support as the postural muscles hold the head directly over the vertebral column, receiving maximum muscle support. The golf cart rider sits and relaxes in a cart approximately 75 times during a round. Exercise Tip: To avoid and minimize the forward head position, slightly tuck the chin and do this 2-3 times and hold for several seconds, while sitting in the golf cart.

Posture awareness and physical preparedness are key elements to pain free golf. If you have questions concerning screening examination or treatment of golf-related injuries feel free to contact our office and speak to a physical therapist.

Call to set up a free appointment if you would like to attend this free Golf Fitness Screening located inside Ivyrehab Briarcliff at (914)762-2222. In addition, if you would like to be seen right away for an injury or chronic pain under Direct Access (no prescription required), contact us at Ivyrehab Briarcliff at (914) 762-2222; or Ivyrehab Jefferson Valley at (914) 245-8807. You can also visit our website at www.ivyrehab.com.

Ivyrehab accepts most insurance plans (which our office obtains pre-approval from your insurance carrier) and will submit your office visit treatments for payment. You will be responsible for your co-payment depending on your particular insurance policy.

With one-on-one care this permits the therapist to construct a personalized program for the individual. After all, when it comes to rehabilitation, “it’s all about the people”.

References:
1) http://www.statista.com/statistics/227420/number-of-golfers-usa/
2) Batt, M., A Survey of Golf Injuries, British Journal of Sports Medicine 63-65, 1992
3) www.livestrong.com

Free Golf Screenings held inside Ivyrehab Briarcliff with Brian McLean, DPT, Director:
Monday, March 7, 2016 4:00- 7:00 PM
Tuesday March 8, 2016 9:00-11:00 AM
Wednesday, March 9, 2016 4:00-7:00 PM

Ivy Rehab

Prevent Skiing Knee Injuries on the Slope

BY: Meryle Richman, PT, DPT, Senior Director of Ivyrehab Briarcliff and Jefferson Valley

As the cold weather approaches, many of us turn out thoughts and energy to the ski slopes. With this ever increasing interest, we gathered information to enhance conditioning for downhill skiing to help prevent common knee injuries.

The most common skiing injuries that occur in the lower limb, as a result of collisions and falls, are knee sprains/tears, which include Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) and Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) sprains/tears. With new advances in ski equipment today such as releasable bindings, the statistics have changed to decreasing leg fractures to 90% and 30% for knee injuries.

According to the American Physical Therapy Association, (http://www.moveforwardpt.com/resources), (1) Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) injuries are more common in the beginner and intermediate skier when the ski tips are pointed towards one another in a snow plow positon, when the skier is trying to slow down or stop.

Prevention Tips for MCL injuries:

● Make sure your weight is balance when you are in a snowplow position
● Stay on comfortable terrain

(2) Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) injuries occur when the skier lands from a jump with their weight back on the boot. This causes a significant force on the back of the boot and the force pushes on the calf, which results in spraining or tearing the ACL

● Another common ACL tear is the “phantom foot” phenomenon. This occurs when the skier tries to stand up in order to prevent a fall. All the weight goes on the outside of one ski, and the arms and trunk rotates away from that leg.


Prevention Tips for ACL Injuries:

● Land safely with your weight forward. Start with simple jumps and gradually advance to more difficult jumps
● Do not try to stand up and go with the momentum of the fall and maintain good ski technique

Tips for Preparing for the slopes:

1. Make sure you have the proper equipment and take a skiing lesson if you have not skied in a while. Prepare yourself to three to four weeks before you go skiing with the recommended flexibility, strengthening and endurance program recommended below:

2. A safe and enjoyable ski season begins with a pre-slope program designed to promote adequate flexibility, strength and endurance. The scope of the conditioning program is dependent upon the physical condition of each individual.

Flexibility is among the most vital components of an effective conditioning program. Primary consideration should be given to maximizing the flexibility of the quadriceps, hamstrings, gastrocnemius, soleus, trunk rotators, shoulder girdle and low back musculature. Long, slow static stretching of these muscle groups is recommended.

Strength is another consideration. The quadriceps muscle group is of primary concern to the heavy demand placed on it when downhill skiing. Strengthening of the gluteals, hip adductors and the arms are also recommended. Inadequate strength affects ski technique and increases injury risk.

Endurance should also be addressed in a ski conditioning program. As with the other components of strength and flexibility, the amount of endurance training is relative to the fitness level of the individual. One can choose from running, swimming, cycling, rowing and Elliptical trainer. Endurance workouts may also incorporate a plan that strengthens the muscles used in skiing, as well as increasing endurance. Examples of ski- oriented training are: traverse running; box jumping.

Skiers should also prepare themselves with an adequate warm-up of stretching the upper extremities and the back before getting the skis on in the morning and can even include jumping jacks or jogging in place. Due to the nature of the physical demands of the sport, a run or two on an easier slope is recommended as a final warm-up.

Fatigue is inherent in a full day of skiing. Studies have shown that injury rates are increased toward the end of the day. Beginners should consider skiing a half day until their endurance improves. Care should be taken to monitor physical status and pacing your runs on the slopes with adequate food and water breaks in order to have a safe day.

Recommended Flexibility Program:

• Standing quadriceps stretch – pull heel toward buttock until a stretch is felt in front of thigh, hold 30seconds, repeat on opposite side.
• Standing hamstring stretch – Place heel on a bench. Slowly lean forward reaching down towards your shin until a stretch is felt at the back of the thigh. Keep the knee straight and back straight, hold 30 seconds, repeat on opposite side.

• Calf stretch – Keeping back leg straight, with heel on floor and turned slightly outward, lean into wall until a stretch is felt in calf, hold 30 seconds, repeat on opposite side.

• Standing trunk rotation stretch – Turn shoulders to one side while keeping hips forward, hold 30 seconds, repeat on opposite side.
• Standing trunk lateral flexion stretch – Reach over and upward while sliding opposite arm down leg, hold 30 seconds, repeat on opposite side.

Recommended Strengthening Exercises:

• Circuit training
• Free weights
• Isometric strengthening in the “downhill position”

Have fun on the slopes!
Ivy Rehab

Prevent Skiing – Knee Injuries on the Slope

Screen Shot 2016-01-19 at 12.37.05 PMBY: Meryle Richman, PT, DPT, Senior Director of Ivyrehab Briarcliff and Jefferson Valley

As the cold weather approaches, many of us turn out thoughts and energy to the ski slopes. With this ever increasing interest, we gathered information to enhance conditioning for downhill skiing to help prevent common knee injuries.

The most common skiing injuries that occur in the lower limb, as a result of collisions and falls, are knee sprains/tears, which include Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) and Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) sprains/tears. With new advances in ski equipment today such as releasable bindings, the statistics have changed to decreasing leg fractures to 90% and 30% for knee injuries.

According to the American Physical Therapy Association, (http://www.moveforwardpt.com/resources), (1) Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) injuries are more common in the beginner and intermediate skier when the ski tips are pointed towards one another in a snow plow positon, when the skier is trying to slow down or stop.

Prevention Tips for MCL injuries:
● Make sure your weight is balance when you are in a snowplow position
● Stay on comfortable terrain

(2) Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) injuries occur when the skier lands from a jump with their weight back on the boot. This causes a significant force on the back of the boot and the force pushes on the calf, which results in spraining or tearing the ACL

● Another common ACL tear is the “phantom foot” phenomenon. This occurs when the skier tries to stand up in order to prevent a fall. All the weight goes on the outside of one ski, and the arms and trunk rotates away from that leg.

Prevention Tips for ACL Injuries:
● Land safely with your weight forward. Start with simple jumps and gradually advance to more difficult jumps

● Do not try to stand up and go with the momentum of the fall and maintain good ski technique

Tips for Preparing for the slopes:

1. Make sure you have the proper equipment and take a skiing lesson if you have not skied in a while. Prepare yourself to three to four weeks before you go skiing with the recommended flexibility, strengthening and endurance program recommended below:

2. A safe and enjoyable ski season begins with a pre-slope program designed to promote adequate flexibility, strength and endurance. The scope of the conditioning program is dependent upon the physical condition of each individual.

Flexibility is among the most vital components of an effective conditioning program. Primary consideration should be given to maximizing the flexibility of the quadriceps, hamstrings, gastrocnemius, soleus, trunk rotators, shoulder girdle and low back musculature. Long, slow static stretching of these muscle groups is recommended.

Strength is another consideration. The quadriceps muscle group is of primary concern to the heavy demand placed on it when downhill skiing. Strengthening of the gluteals, hip adductors and the arms are also recommended. Inadequate strength affects ski technique and increases injury risk.

Endurance should also be addressed in a ski conditioning program. As with the other components of strength and flexibility, the amount of endurance training is relative to the fitness level of the individual. One can choose from running, swimming, cycling, rowing and Elliptical trainer. Endurance workouts may also incorporate a plan that strengthens the muscles used in skiing, as well as increasing endurance. Examples of ski- oriented training are: traverse running; box jumping.

Skiers should also prepare themselves with an adequate warm-up of stretching the upper extremities and the back before getting the skis on in the morning and can even include jumping jacks or jogging in place. Due to the nature of the physical demands of the sport, a run or two on an easier slope is recommended as a final warm-up.

Fatigue is inherent in a full day of skiing. Studies have shown that injury rates are increased toward the end of the day. Beginners should consider skiing a half day until their endurance improves. Care should be taken to monitor physical status and pacing your runs on the slopes with adequate food and water breaks in order to have a safe day.

Recommended Flexibility Program:
• Standing quadriceps stretch – pull heel toward buttock until a stretch is felt in front of thigh, hold 30seconds, repeat on opposite side.

• Standing hamstring stretch – Place heel on a bench. Slowly lean forward reaching down towards your shin until a stretch is felt at the back of the thigh. Keep the knee straight and back straight, hold 30 seconds, repeat on opposite side.

• Calf stretch – Keeping back leg straight, with heel on floor and turned slightly outward, lean into wall until a stretch is felt in calf, hold 30 seconds, repeat on opposite side.

• Standing trunk rotation stretch – Turn shoulders to one side while keeping hips forward, hold 30 seconds, repeat on opposite side.

• Standing trunk lateral flexion stretch – Reach over and upward while sliding opposite arm down leg, hold 30 seconds, repeat on opposite side.

Recommended Strengthening Exercises:

• Circuit training

• Free weights

• Isometric strengthening in the “downhill position”

Have fun on the slopes!
Ivy Rehab

Parisi Speed School has a New Director

— Written by Club Fit Member and Guest Blogger Joy Cain

 

Prescott Perry comes to Club Fit as the New Director for Parisi Speed School.

Parisi Speed School’s mission is to help young athletes become better, faster, stronger.

Who, then, is better equipped to help them than a young man who is on the fast track?

Enter Prescott Perry, the new director of the Parisi Speed School at Club Fit.

Prescott played lacrosse and studied kinesiology at the University of Rhode Island. He snowboarded competitively and worked as a personal trainer on Coronado Island (off the coast of San Diego). He also sailed competitively, participating in races in Newport and Larchmont. And he earned his MBA from Lynn University in Boca Raton, Fla.

One can only imagine what he’ll do when he finally turns 26.

“I’ve always thought that I wanted to be successful more than I wanted air to breathe, “ Prescott says, “so I try to do as much as I can with what I’ve got. ”

Indeed. And the success he’s chasing after now involves getting more athletes and teams to jump on the Parisi bandwagon. While noting that Westchester and Putnam counties have no shortage of gyms, health clubs, and exercise facilities, Prescott says that the type of training that Parisi offers is a cut above.

“Parisi has a measurable standard. When you’re able to show how much a certain drill or exercise is improving an athlete’s performance, there’s a certain amount of buy-in. ”

Prescott will be reaching out to local coaches to encourage them to bring their teams in to train with Parisi. Eventually he hopes to get a tie-in along with the buy-in; since a company he once worked for helps athletes get recruited for college, Prescott wants to introduce a similar protocol at Club Fit and post the stats of our Parisi-trained athletes on a nationally-recognized recruiting database. In this way, college coaches nationwide could view the athletes’ progressions and measure their athletic potential. It’s a win-win situation for everyone.

But while the focus on jocks and jockettes is important, it shouldn’t be the entire Parisi picture. Citing an upward trend of childhood obesity, Prescott says that Parisi needs to make room for couch potatoes, too.

“We want to focus more on the kids who get picked last in gym,” he says. “We want to let them see that what we’re doing is not hard, that it doesn’t take much to be considered athletic. You can be athletic and not know it. You just have to tap that inner athlete inside yourself. And that’s one thing I think Parisi is able to do. ”

Typically, Parisi’s small group sessions are broken up by age. The Jump Start program (ages 7–11) sets the foundation for success in any sport by focusing on speed, agility, and overall coordination. The Total Performance program (ages 12–16) focuses on techniques used in speed, agility and strength to maximize improvements in athletic performance. And the Peak program (ages 17–21) is an individualized coaching program for the elite athlete. It focuses on individual needs, goals and improvements needed to compete at a competitive level.

Although upwards of 100 young people are involved in the program right now, a demographic shift may be in the wind. Prescott hopes to see more adults train with Parisi—tennis players, swimmers and Weekend Warriors who could benefit from agility and strength drills that are tailor-made for their sport. “I don’t think it’s ever too late for adults to try and do something like that, to make themselves into better athletes,” he says.

His competitive snowboarding days are behind him, but Prescott, a bachelor, still plays in an adult lacrosse league. And although he hasn’t done much of it lately, he still sails competitively. “Yeah…. with a name like Prescott, I kinda had to do sailing,” he jokes. “I’m a stereotypical guy; my name is Prescott, I’m from Connecticut, I sail and do everything that goes with it…. ”

But all jokes aside, Prescott is committed to taking Club Fit’s Parisi program to the next level. Besides watching the bottom line and drumming up new business for the program, Prescott, along with Vince Wright and Jen Ritz, will also be one of the Parisi instructors. “I want to get this facility to be the new standard of training for this area,” he declares.

Better. Faster. Stronger. Now.

If anyone can get Parisi on the fast track, Prescott can.

My Love for Tennis

Tennis

Alice


By Alice Daly
Tennis and Reception Manager
Club Fit Jefferson Valley

What’s not to LOVE about the game of Tennis? A game that can be learned at any age; a game that can be played with two players or four players; a game that continuously evolves with better equipment; a game that creates relationships for a lifetime.

My LOVE for tennis began in my early thirties as a neighbor in my new neighborhood brought me to the Club Fit JV courts to play. Comical as it was the first few times, I was totally hooked. I met other players with young children and we began the beautiful ritual of “Do you want to play tennis today?” Early morning phone calls became the starting shot for getting court time, tennis dress ritual, and packing up the kids. Our daily lives became intertwined as we learned how to play tennis-sometimes self-taught (we thought we knew so much!) and, more wisely, with a Tennis Pro. With passing years, some of our players moved on or away, and we gained some new players, adding another level of friendship to our group. I, along with my friends, became participants in USTA teams and events, enjoying the competition and camaraderie for many years.

I strongly believe that lessons, clinics, and playing in leagues is a major component to keeping your game fresh and focused. Competition at all levels, whether singles or doubles, is one of the best tools for developing confidence and poise on the courts. An additional plus to competition is the enrichment of meeting different players that may, or may not, become a part of your life. There is no better time than now to make the move, grab a racquet, get on the court and play tennis-a game to LOVE for life!

To learn more about Tennis at Jefferson Valley, visit us on our website!

Top 10 Reasons to make Club Fit your Summer Camp

Summer Camp is something kids look forward to all year long! So, it’s never to early to start researching the best fit for your child. We hope you will consider Club Fit your home away from home (during the day) all Summer long!

1 – Climate Controlled Facility – Rain or shine our campers have the best camp experience EVERYDAY!

2 – Daily hot & healthy lunch is included – One less thing for you to worry about!

3 – Extended Care – As early as 7:30am and as late as 7pm!

4 – Daily FREE Swim – For an additional fee Instructional swim is also available with our fantastic Water Safety Instructors.

5 – Early Registration discounts – The earlier you register the more you save!

6 – FUN – We guarantee your child will have endless fun all summer long!

7 – Flexibility – Come for 1 week, 2 weeks, or the whole summer, you choose. Our registration options are a la carte

8 – Specialists – We have the best Tennis Pro’s, Water Safety Instructors and Soccer Coaches available to your child all summer long

9 – Theme Days – Carnival Day, Mad Science Day, Color Wars & Lego day are just a few of our exciting theme days.

10 – Not just a Camp – Our membership options provide you and your entire family with access to everything Club Fit has to offer!

Swimc

Call today for your tour of our facility.

914-245-4040 x 1127

Click here to learn more about Club Fit Summer Camp!

Alice Daly’s US Round Robin Recap

What a wonderful way for Club Fit JV to celebrate the last Grand Slam of the season with our US Open Round Robin and BBQ from late afternoon to under the lights on a balmy summer August day!

Tennis at Club Fit

Tennis fun at Club Fit Jefferson Valley

The event began with some of our junior players and their parents show casing their fancy footwork and court coverage. When their play time came to an end, Hal and Paul played an exhibition match that took our breath away with blistering serves and volleys not to be believed! During this time, Diane Rich and Peter were preparing the first round of BBQ for our early participants.

As dusk began to settle, JV tennis players began to arrive for the evening festivities. Hal got our players on the courts to begin the Round Robin Slam. Music was playing while ground strokes were being finessed and lobs were peppering the sky.

Diane’s delicious BBQ was enjoyed between rounds of play outdoors and indoors keeping 25 members moving the entire evening. The evening ended with raffle prizes galore and everyone having a fabulous time.

Thanks to our team of our awesome Tennis Pros and Staff, this was a fantastic event! We all had a great time providing our Tennis members and their friends and families an enjoyable evening at Club Fit JV.

Check out our Pictures from Club Fit Jefferson Valley’s Tennis Events on Flickr!

MYZONE “Fanatic” and Club Fit Member Rich Polombo

MYZONE user Rich Palombo

Club Fit member Rich Palombo stays motivated with MYZONE.

When it comes to MYZONE, everyone has their own approach. Some are more laid back about it, but there are also the MYZONE fanatics! These people check their numbers religiously, enter every MYZONE Challenge (the Summer Sizzle Challenge begins July 1st at both clubs), and truly track their progress while keeping an eye on everyone else’s numbers on the MYZONE screen. Rich Palombo is in this second camp, and is happy to admit it.

Rich, who has been a Club Fit member for close to 15 years, started using his MYZONE belt last August, when the program was rolled out. And it fell right in line with his competitive nature. Not only did he participate in the various MYZONE challenges, he compared his numbers to his fellow members, at times trying to outpace them, or just keep up. In fact, in one of the early challenges, he spent the entire first weekend working out just to be the first in the club to make the required 1800 MEPs (MYZONE effort points, based on duration of activity and heart rate). And he did it!

The long and short of it? The MYZONE belt gives him the incentive to put more effort into his workout. It is a motivator! “I am all about measurements and metrics,” says Rich. “MYZONE actually made me realize that I could push myself a little bit harder and still work out safely.” At the club, Rich primarily uses the elliptical machines in the Fitness Center, and also plays Tennis and Racquetball. “I’ve always been active, but was never a ‘health club type.’ Club Fit and MYZONE changed that for me.” He also brings his seven-year-old daughter to the pool on weekends, and feels that the club is a great place for people to go as a family. “You may not be working out together, but you are all there to feel better and can leave happy, together.”

Because of Rich’s current job, which takes him to Long Island from his home in Putnam Valley, his workout time has been limited, but he still gets in five workouts a week. “I try to come twice on Saturdays and Sundays, and once during the week,” he says. But even outside of the club, Rich stays active, and wears his MYZONE belt to track his MEPs. He has worn it playing hockey and doing yardwork, and was amazed at how much effort was put forth during these activities.

While some people are using the belt to help them lose weight, at this point in his busy life Rich is happy to maintain. But he does know how effective it can be. “I took a month off between my last job and current job, and was at the gym religiously. I dropped almost 10 pounds in that month by staying focused.” He loves the fact that he can check his numbers after every workout, even on his phone. “With MYZONE you can hold yourself accountable. Unless other people know your user name and follow you on the screen, only you know exactly how hard you are working and whether you are meeting your personal goals.”

Even though his time at the club is now limited, Rich is a huge fan of Club Fit. “The staff and the facility are wonderful,” he says. “I love that I can go there and get a smile from everyone, and that most people know my name. I’ve developed great relationships with some staff members as well as others who use the club.” Rich works in the customer service industry managing call centers, and feels that Club Fit is a definite leader in this area. “In general, people will spend up to 10 percent more on a product or service if the customer service is top-notch. With the personalized attention I get at Club Fit and the great facility, I’m happy to spend a few more dollars to belong here as opposed to a bare bones or quick service gym.”

Even if you are not as much of a MYZONE fanatic as Rich, you can join him this month in the Summer Sizzle Challenge, taking place at both Briarcliff and Jefferson Valley! Simply log in to your MYZONE account and accept the challenge. You only need to rack up 1800 MEPs to earn an entry into a raffle for great prizes. Make it fun, like Rich does; follow fellow members as they rack up points, and set little challenges for yourself. And if you don’t have a belt yet? Stop by the Service Desk at Briarcliff or the Reception Desk at Jefferson Valley and invest in one! “It was such a great investment for me because I like to stay on top of things and know what I am accomplishing,” says Rich. If you are working out at Jefferson Valley, look for “RICHPA” on the MYZONE screen and see if you can keep up!

Want to hear more about Rich’s MYZONE experience? 
Click here to read a MYZONE interview with Rich.

Sizzle Summer Sizzle MYZONE Challenge JULY 1ST – JULY 31ST

MYZONE is all the rage and it’s no surprise! This super motivating piece of technology helps keep us on track even through our vacation seasons. It’s simple, it’s a heart rate monitor- an incredibly smart one! You wear it during your workouts here at the club OR during your home and outdoor workouts. Then when you are near one of the upload stations, it pulls in all that awesome data from your workout and tells you how much effort you were exerting!

One of the best parts of MYZONE is that it allows you to compete against your own personal best or against others when we are holding our challenges. Even some small group trainings utilize it to measure progress throughout a session of trainings or group fitness classes! What’s more, is that we will reward you for reaching your challenge goals!

This Summer, you can join in the fun with our Summer Sizzle Challenge! Check it out:
Summer Sizzle
Keep active during the beautiful summer season!
Going on vacation? Don’t forget to pack your MYZONE belt and upload your workouts in the club when your return. Every participant who reaches 1800 MEPs will earn an entry into a fabulous raffle. (Only one entry per participant, please.)

Challenge—
Earn 1800 MEPs in 30 days:
Each participant who reaches 1800 MEPs will be entered into a raffle for a
chance to win one of three prizes. Drawing will take place on August 6th.
(Winners will be posted at the front desk.)

Prizes:
1st: Pair of Tickets to Westchester Broadway Theatre
2nd: $50 eCash | 3rd: Pair of Tickets to Comedy Night at Club Fit

How to get involved:
If you have a MYZONE belt, login to your personal MYZONE web page
and accept the challenge invitation. If you don’t have a belt yet,
see the front desk for details and join in the fun.

Click here for more information on the MYZONE Challenges at Club Fit Briarcliff: MYZONE Challenges

Click here for more information on the MYZONE Challenges at Club Fit Jefferson Valley: MYZONE Challenges

Seven Primal Movement Patterns to Get Results

Coach Jack Werther, Director of Parisi Speed School at Club Fit Jefferson Valley shares his thoughts on group trainings for individuals who have different goals . . .

Seven Primal Movement Patterns

How does one train both Athletes and Non-Athletes effectively within the same training session? Both types of trainees will have different end goals; losing weight, gaining more muscle, becoming faster, stronger, more flexible, etc. The Answer: Train movement patterns, not muscle groups. There are seven Primal Movement Patterns which the human body utilizes in both sport, and in daily life. By Training each of these movement patterns, one can elicit excellent results, no matter what goal the individual is training for.

The seven primal movement patterns are:

1. Push
2. Pull
3. Squat
4. Lunge
5. Twist
6. Bend
7. Gait (walking/running)

Lunge

The bottom line is that no matter what your goals are this summer; whether training for athletics, or to just get in shape; Parisi has the training for you. If you’re between the ages of 18 and 29, check out our Summer College Program for only $179! Click here for more information!

Why do you train?

Coach Jack wants to know . . .

Why?

Almost every athlete does it. Even non-athletes do it. There almost as many reasons why one would do it as there are ways to do it. Athletic training is a large investment in time, energy (both mentally and physically), and money. It is an investment that certainly pays large dividends if a quality investment is made. Why do you make the investment? Please respond below in the comments section with your reasons why you choose to make this investment, whether for yourself or a child. I’m sure you will find many have the same reasons as you do, and many you may not have even thought of!

Need some information on Athletic Training? Check out The Parisi Program!

Spartan Training Continues . . . sometimes there are bumps along the way!

by Bill Pagel

Well fellow Spartans, my training has not been going well. Very sporadic and inconsistent, but there’s still time and I was encouraged by my efforts in my last 2 workouts. Over the weekend I completed a 5 mile run consisting of 1/4 mile hill intervals. My pace was slow, but I completed the run, which was the goal. I’m lucky that my neighborhood has a perfect loop for this.

Yesterday, I completed a 4 mile progression run. (Treadmills are great for this kind of run.) A one mile warm-up followed by progressively increasing the pace over the next 2.5 miles and I finished with a half mile cool down jog and another half mile of walking.Topped it off with 20 yards of inchworm walks to help stretch and get a little upper body work in. It was tough, but the goal was to finish. Now I have to keep the consistency going over the next 17 days and hopefully I’ll be able to keep up on race day.

Arooh!

Tennis Courts- What’s the big difference?

Does the court you’re playing on really make a difference?
The answer to that is a resounding YES!

Let’s just start by saying there are over 100 different kinds of tennis court surfaces. Since we’d be here forever if we were to list each and every one, let’s just focus on the four main types of surfaces and talk about the benefits and drawbacks to each.

1. Hard Courts Hard Courts are the most common courts and often the ones you would find at public facilities but are also used in some tennis clubs and professional tournaments in this area. Compared to the other main type of courts, hard court conditions vary very little during the entire year and are fairly easy to maintain. The balls bounce fairly high and very consistently but players, specially “seasoned players”, often develop or aggravate lower body injuries playing on these hard surfaces. It usually favors all-around players.
2. Clay Courts Clay Courts are considered one of the slower surfaces to play on, balls bounce high and they favor those with a baseline game, and not the huge servers with the serve-and-volley style of play. Many players with “Big Games” (e.g. Pete Sampras and Federer) struggle to play their best tennis on these type of courts. Clay requires a lot of upkeep, as it must be “frequently watered, rolled and brushed, according to the USTA.” Most country clubs and high-end clubs in this area use them and this major upkeep is offset by the conditions of play these courts create for their players. These courts, as the name states, are softer than the other main types of courts and much easier on players bodies being the preferred type – or the ONLY type – by seasoned players play on. Since clay courts also slow down the game, it is also advantageous for players learning the game – adults or kids – to make use of them.
3. Grass Courts Grass Courts are the fastest surfaces that are played on. The world’s longest running and most prestigious tournament, Wimbledon is held on grass. You do not see many grass courts these days and one of the reasons for that, is that it takes a great deal more maintenance than any other surface. It can also be an unpredictable surface to play on due to the changing conditions of the grass itself, how recently it has been mowed and even how much it has been played on. Balls bounce really low on grass and because of that this surface is considered to be the most difficult surface to play on.
4. Carpet Courts Carpet Courts are used mainly on indoor facilities with cold Winters. This is one of the less popular surfaces and is not used to host many major tournaments. There is a very short season of professional tournaments in Europe and not many tournaments, on this surface, are found in the US.

At Club Fit we use Har-Tru clay surfaces for our main tennis courts. “Har-Tru is made from billion-year-old Pre-Cambrian metabasalt found in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia. It is a natural green stone that is extremely hard and angular, two very important qualities when it comes to tennis court construction. The angularity helps the stone particles lock together to form a stable playing surface.

The hardness provides exceptional durability. The natural green color is classically clay and instantly recognizable. The stone is crushed, screened, and mixed in the precise proportions necessary to produce a stable playing surface. It is then installed over a porous base of crushed stone aggregate to produce the final product.” Read more about the benefits of Har-Tru Green Clay.

Rodrigo Hartru Club Fit Briarcliff Tennis Director, Rodrigo Schtscherbyna and Har-Tru Court Surface.

To learn more about our tennis program, contact Briarcliff Tennis Director: Rodrigo Schtscherbyna at rschtscherbyna@clubfit.com or Jefferson Valley Tennis Director: Harold Toussaint at htoussaint@clubfit.com.
Meet the Pros at Briarcliff!
Meet the Pros at Jefferson Valley!
Sources: http://hartru.com/

CLUB FIT MAKES MILLION-DOLLAR INVESTMENT IN TENNIS!

We are excited to announce the upcoming installation of new, state-of-the-art air-supported domes to house the indoor tennis courts come this September, 2014. This million-dollar investment is expected to accomplish a number of things, including better playing conditions and more efficient energy usage in keeping with the club’s commitment to becoming more “green.”

The new infrastructures, manufactured by Yeadon Domes, a leader in the industry, incorporate new technology that all but eliminates the issues that had begun to surface in the existing bubbles. Read more here. Both are 20-plus years old, considered a normal life expectancy for structures of this kind. “This installation has been on our to-do list, but with the harsh winters of the past few years on top of normal wear and tear, we feel the timing couldn’t be better,” says Bill Beck, President of Club Fit. “It will not only eliminate many of our maintenance issues, it will help to make our members’ playing experience the best it can be, and that’s our priority.”

Rodrigo Schtscherbyna, Director of Tennis at Club Fit Briarcliff, is looking forward to the improved conditions for the club’s members and visiting teams. “We always want to go above and beyond expectations,” he says. “This will be just another part of providing good service to our tennis clientele.” He will be working closely with the maintenance staff during the summer months to minimize disruption, scheduling lessons and Summer Camp sessions earlier in the day and later in the afternoon. Most construction work will be done in the early afternoon, when the courts are traditionally not as busy. The club also intends to increase staffing focused on maintaining the courts during the summer months.

What will be different? For starters, the new bubbles will be insulated, which will make a big difference with heat retention, and make the heating process more efficient. Condensation, a normal part of “life in a bubble,” will be diverted so as not to drip on playing surfaces…or players! New three-paneled doors will replace the old four-paneled structures, with wider openings allowing for ease of entry and exit.
Prep work will involve removal of the old oil tank and heating units, and installation of the new equipment. It will also involve testing of the new equipment so as to avoid problems once the new bubbles are up and running. “We expect to remain on our normal schedule, with outdoor play all summer long and the bubbles open for business in early September, as usual,” says Bill Beck. “Our summer players will have to put up with a bit of commotion this season, but in the end it will be worth the inconvenience. We appreciate their patience, and know they’ll be happy with the end result.”

For 40 years, Club Fit has worked to enhance quality of life and physical well being for members of all ages. In addition to the club’s state-of-the-art facilities and comprehensive programming, Club Fit is also an active member of the local community. Founded in 1973, Club Fit operates clubs in Briarcliff Manor and Jefferson Valley, serving more than 10,000 members and their guests.
Click Here for information on our Tennis Summer Camp!
Click here for more on our staff of awesome Tennis Pros!
For some general Tennis information visit the Tennis page on our website!

Swim Team makes more waves!

Oh Yeah! Here we go again!

13 CFJV swimmers qualified and attended the SVY March Madness LCM meet at Princeton University on 3/18. Danielle Taps was Event Champion in the 200 FR, and 2nd in the 400FR and 200 IM. Lea Frenkel placed 3rd in the 50 BK with a Zone qualifying time of 35.00 and Remy Eppner qualified for Junior Olympics in the 50 BR. Way to go Club Fit/JV!

For more information on joining the Swim Team please visit us!
Click here: Club Fit Jefferson Valley Swim Team

Programs for infants, kids and teens at Club Fit Jefferson Valley!

Here is a great resource for all the Moms and Dads who need a quick resource to see what we offer by age group at Club Fit! It is hard to jump from one page to the next so we’ve compiled a list of all our offerings for infants, toddlers, grade-schoolers, tweens and teens!

Ages: 6 months – 3 years
Parent Toddler Swim Lessons
2 Much Fun
Tumble Tots
Summer Camp
Ages: 3 – 4
Yoga for Kids
Intro to Sports
Pre-School Group Swim Lessons
Summer Camp
Ages: 4 – 6
Pee Wee Karate
Zumba Kids Jr
Summer Camp
Pre-School Group Swim Lessons
Swim Lessons
Soccer (ages 5-8)
Ages: 5 – 9
Step up Your Sports
Soccer (ages 5-8)
Yoga for Kids
Tumbles
Kids Karate
Swim Lessons
Tennis
Beginner Swim Clinics
Beginner Swim Clinic
Summer Camp
Schools Out Camp
Ages: 7 – 12
Paris Speed School
Tumbles
Kids Karate
Zumba Kids
Yoga for Kids
Quickstart Tennis
Junior Team Tennis
Summer Tennis Camp
School Break Tennis Camp
Tennis Beginner
Tennis Advanced Beginner
Summer Camp
Boy Scout Swimming Merit Badge
Beginner Swim Clinic
Advanced Swim Clinic
Junior Spin (ages 9-12)
Junior Boot Camp (ages 8-12)
Racquetball
Racquetball School’s Out Camp
Schools Out Camp
Soccer Schools Out Clinic
Basketball School’s Out ClinicSummer Camp
Parisi Cat Club Challenge
Parisi Cat Club Challenge
Ages: 12 – 15
Parisi Total Performance
Parisi Private Training
Boy Scout Life Saving Merit Badge
Parisi Cat Club Challenge
Tennis Beginner High School Level (starting at age 14)
Tennis Intermediate
Tennis High Performance
Ages: 15 – 18
Boy Scout Life Saving Merit Badge
Parisi Cat Club Challenge
School Break Tennis Camp
Summer Break Tennis Camp
Junior Team Tennis
Tennis Beginner High School Level (starting at age 14)
Tennis Intermediate
Tennis High Performance
All Ages
Private Swim Lessons

Supervised Strength Training

By Jack Werther, Parisi Speed School Director, Club Fit Jefferson Valley

From the moment one sits up in the crib, they begin strength training. Strength training is simply a form of physical activity by which muscular fitness is improved by working against an external force. Strength training can take many forms, such as lifting free weights, pushups, standing up from a seated position, or sprinting. Because strength training can take so many forms, it is beneficial for all ages, from birth until death . . . with one caveat; it must be done correctly and appropriately.

There is no reason for an eight year old to be on a bench trying to press double is body weight, or in the rack trying to squat for a new PR; it’s simply counter-productive. At some point in time that may in fact be something that is appropriate, however at the onset of every strength training journey there are two constants: begin with body weight exercises and have proper supervision. According to the American Council on Exercise (ACE), weight training can commence as early as 7 years old. While physiologically that may absolutely be correct, how many 7 year olds do you know that can perform a pushup or squat utilizing absolutely perfect form? My guess would be none. Once an athlete has mastered the movement patterns with body weight, it is absolutely appropriate to add external resistance . . . with proper supervision. Proper supervision is imperative not only to make sure that everything is done safely, but correctly. There is a big difference between lifting weights and exercising your muscles with weights. Proper coaching ensures the latter; maximizing results and reducing the potential for injury.

Learn more about Parisi Speed School at Club Fit.