Trainer of the Month Leslie Kesselman

August 23, 2018 by karen

September 2018 Club Fit Briarcliff Trainer of the Month Leslie Kesselman

Leslie will be giving a free-to-member presentation in our Conference Room on Monday, September 17th at 3:30 pm and Thursday, September 20th at 11:30 am

Subject: Active Aging

Club Fit Master Trainer Leslie Kesselman
Club Fit Master Trainer Leslie Kesselman

Greetings!

My name is Leslie Kesselman. I am a master trainer and a group exercise instructor at Club Fit. I have been in the business of exercise; educating and working with individuals for 35 years. I have been at Club Fit for 21 years. I have learned, grown and received much gratification along the way.

When we moved up to Westchester I decided to join a gym, mostly to meet people. I started going to group fitness classes and really enjoyed them. I found that exercising made me feel good. It felt healthy to be moving. I felt better than I did in years. I became a fitness instructor that year. I was fit, healthy and happy.

During my tenure as a group fitness instructor and master trainer I have worked with many different populations. Today the focus of my work is with the active aging population. The aging process presents many changes physiologically. We lose muscle mass, our joints become arthritic and stiff, our bones lose density, our neuromuscular system slows down, our balance and ability to react are compromised. There are postural changes. Maybe you’ve had a joint replacement? These issues can be addressed and improved with different forms of exercise such as; strength training to build bone density and muscular strength, balance exercises to prevent falling, proper alignment and core work exercises to help keep you injury free and flexibility exercises to increase range of motion around a joint to ease symptoms of discomfort.

Aging is a slow but inevitable process. You have the ability to delay that process and be as active and healthy as possible. Let me help you achieve that. I will design an individualized exercise program for you that takes into account your interests and goals as well as your limitations and health risks.

Exercising is worth the time and the effort. It makes you healthier. It makes you feel better. You can continue to do more of the activities that you enjoy. You can live your life to the fullest!

Better Balance Now!

August 22, 2016 by Liz

Ivy Rehab
Fall Prevention
Meryle Richman, PT, DPT, MS, CST, RYT

As we age the ability to maintain balance becomes more difficult. Many factors influence good balance, some of them are biological; and some we are able to influence and are able to improve. Balance and stability are important factors for aging adults to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Loss of balance is the primary factor in falls, which often results in serious injuries.

Good balance is dependent on sensory input form the eyes, the correct functioning of the balance system in the inner ear, posture and center of gravity and our ability to sense the position and movement in our feet, legs and arms. Vision affects the balance system, as the eyes send messages to the brain telling us where objects are in space.

Aging adults are affected by a loss of muscle mass and strength. This is associated with an increased risk of falls and hip fractures. It also has a great affect on maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Weakness in the ankle musculature may cause difficulty in recovering lost balance more quickly. Strong quadriceps muscles are necessary for good balance and walking. Evidence shows the strength and aerobic training can lead to a reduction in falls.

Loss of flexibility occurs with age. This may lead to difficulty climbing stairs, transferring from sit to stand and or getting out of bed without difficulty. Much of the loss of flexibility is due to inactivity. Flexibility exercises, stretches, gentle yoga will help improve flexibility of major muscle groups and therefore improve ones ability to complete everyday activities.

Postural changes develop as people age but not because they age. Rounded shoulders, forward head postures, increased thoracic curves in the spine are common postural changes. These changes affect the center of gravity in the body moving it forward. With changes in the center of gravity, older adults are more prone to loss of balance and an increased risk of falls.

Medications also contribute to the deterioration of the balance system. Research has shown that adding new medications in the previous two weeks increases the risk for falling.

There are many ways we can adapt to the changes in our bodies as we age. Some helpful tips include:

1. Promote safety in the home by using non-skid surfaces, eliminating area rugs & improve lighting in the home

2. Get a yearly eye exam

3. Proper nutrition and hydration

4. Know the side effects of your medication

5. Use caution with pets running around in your home

5. Different forms of exercise, such as strengthening exercises, flexibility and stretches, postural exercise, yoga, tai chi, and aerobic exercise such as walking, will all contribute to decreasing the risk of falls and improve your balance.

Guidelines from The American College of Sports Medicine suggest that:

1) Healthy adults under the age of 65 should aim for:

– Moderate intense cardiovascular exercises 30 minutes a day (aerobic exercise), five days a week or vigorous intense exercises 20 minutes a day, 3 days a week and strengthening-exercises twice a week

– Flexibility or stretching exercises are also recommended a minimum of 2-3 days a week

2) Healthy adults 65 years or older:

– Low-to-Moderate aerobic exercises, 30 minutes a day, 5 times a week and gentle strengthening-exercises (very light weights), 2- 3 times a week

– Flexibility or stretching exercises at a minimum of 2-3 times a week

Types of Aerobic and Low-to-Moderate Exercises:
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If you want to determine your fitness level, refer to the reference guide from The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

For beginners, you can simply start out by learning the basics of the talk test, which is a rule of thumb for doing moderate-intensity activity and you can still talk, but not sing during an activity. However, if you are doing a vigorous-activity you would want to learn how to find your target heart rate and determine what intensity range you should be exercising at for optimal cardiac performance.

Check out the Stay Healthy Website to determine a simple way to find your target heart rate at: www.cancer.org/healthy/toolsandcalculators/calculators/app/target-heart-rate-calculator. Once you find your target heart rate, wearing a heart rate monitor will make it easier to monitor your desired rate.

If you would like to improve your current level of fitness, but still have questions about how to begin a safe exercise program if you had an injury or illness, our experienced and dedicated licensed physical therapists can help you get started. With Direct Access a prescription is not required to be evaluated. Contact Ivyrehab Briarcliff (914) 762 – 2222 and Ivyrehab Jefferson Valley (914) 245 – 8807 or visit our Website: www.ivyrehab.com to learn more about Direct Access.

References:
(1) Exercise: Designing a Cardiac exercise Program. New York-Presbyterian Hospital. Retrieved September 2, 2011 from http://nyp.org/health/cardiac_exercis3.html
(2) American College of Sports Medicine Position Stand. Retrieved September 2, 2011 from http://www.mhhe.com/hper/nutrition/williams/student/appendix_i.pdf