Cooking Demo presented by Peter Pratt’s Inn

September 28, 2017 by karen

We enjoyed some food and fun last night in Jefferson Valley! Chef Jon Pratt of Peter Pratt’s Inn presented a free cooking demo to our members. We gathered in the Café to watch, listen, and — most importantly — taste! A vegetarian meal of soup and salad was taken to different level with the use of fresh, local ingredients and a variety of spices and seasonings. Jonathan gave us some useful tips and tricks along the way, including letting us in on a special “secret” ingredient.

John also shared his “Corn Chowda” recipe with us. Bear in mind, quantities will need to be reduced as this was made to fed a crowd! For best results, use fresh, local ingredients whenever possible. No time to shop for the best local produce? Join Field Goods and get your order dropped off weekly at our Jefferson Valley location. You can order produce, dairy products, spices and more.

We’ll be hosting another cooking demo next Week in Briarcliff, on Wednesday, October 4th. Hope to see you there!

Salad prepared by Chef Jon Pratt at our cooking demo
“Glazed & Confused Salad”
Grain and Arugula Salad with Miso Glazed Sweet Potato.
Chef Jon and Club Fit Member Pete dishing it up at our cooking demo
Jon & Pete
Corn chowder prepared by Chef Jon Pratt at our cooking demo
“Corn Chowda” by Jon Prat of Peter Pratt’s Inn

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Corn Chowda”

1 case: sweet corn, raw, peeled and cut off the cob
2 lbs: butter
10 each: Spanish onions, small dice
12 each: red bell peppers, small dice
1 head: celery, small dice
2 heads: garlic, peeled and minced
3 each: jalapeños, seeded and minced
3 bunches: thyme, chopped fine
½ cup: smoked paprika
as needed: corn stock
2 quarts white wine
4 quarts heavy cream
6 bunches basil, coarsely chopped
to taste: sherry vinegar (secret ingredient!)

Make corn stock by simmering corn cobs in water just to cover for about 45 minutes. Try to yield as little as possible while still covering the cobs with water for full extraction. Strain and reserve.

Sweat down the onions and garlic in the butter with salt and pepper until slightly tender and translucent. Add the rest of the vegetables, the thyme and the smoked paprika. Sweat until tender, no color. Add the corn in stages, stirring well to coat with butter. Once the mixture comes back up to a simmer, add the white wine and reduce to sec. Add corn stock and reduce until very thick, then add all of the cream and reduce until thickened again. Adjust seasoning with salt, pepper, and a little champagne vinegar if it’s too sweet. Remove from the heat, puree half of the mixture, and return it to the pot. Fold in the chopped basil, still off of the heat, and check the seasoning again. Yum!

“Glazed & Confused Salad”
Grain and Arugula Salad with Miso Glazed Sweet Potato

Peel and cut 3 sweet potatoes; toss with olive oil and s&p; set aside

Simmer 20 minutes: 1/2 cup white miso with 1/2 cup soy, 1/2 cup mirin, 1/2 cup sake, 2 tablespoon sesame oil, 1/2 cup brown sugar; set aside to just warm

Cook separately in lightly salted water:
1 cup quinoa
1 cup wheat berries
1 cup barley or faro or your favorite grain
1 cup French green lentils

Reserve to room temp:
1 cup avocado chunks
2 cups favorite mushroom sautéed

Roast sweet potatoes in 375 oven until caramelized on edges; toss with a few tablespoons of reserved dressing and set aside.

Assemble: Add greens to salad bowl and all above grains. Top with sweet potatoes, mushrooms and avocado. When ready to eat, drizzle the appropriate amount of sauce and a little olive oil and your favorite vinegar or lemon juice.

 

 

Reduce Your Risk of Osteoporosis: Learn Preventative Exercise Tips

May 19, 2016 by Liz

by Meryle Richman, PT, DPT, MS, CST, RYT
Ivy Rehab

Osteoporosis is a disease affecting approximately 10 million men and women in America. It is the progressive loss of bone mineral density. With bone loss over time the bones become weak and brittle leading to the increased likelihood of fractures, and bone deformation. The cost to our nation’s economy can be as much as 13 billion dollars per year in lost productivity and health care costs.

Who is at Risk for Osteoporosis?

Eighty percent of those with Osteoporosis are women. Women over 65 years of age are at much greater risk than men for Osteoporosis. Anyone diagnosed with Osteopenia, low bone density and a precursor to Osteoporosis is at greater risk. Other risk factors include women who are white or Asian, postmenopausal, cigarette smoking, sedentary lifestyle and some medication. Also women who have had long-term menstrual problems or have mineral absorption problems may also be at risk.

What can happen if you have Osteoporosis?

Osteoporosis causes a hunched forward posture and the formation of a hump, in the middle back and decreasing height. Poor posture and muscle tension due to the hunched posture can contribute to the increase of falling because the person’s center of gravity is shifted forward. Weak and brittle bones increase the likelihood of fracture during falls or fractures of the spine.

Some symptoms that may be caused by Osteoporosis include back pain, poor posture, lost height and decreased mobility. Anyone over 65 or postmenopausal women should be screened for osteoporosis even if symptoms are not present. Doctors will perform bone density scans to rate the persons bone density and determine their diagnosis based on that scan.

Tips on how Physical Therapy can help Osteoporosis:

1. Physical therapy can be utilized to manage to progression of Osteopenia, Osteoporosis and their symptoms. The patient’s goals include prevention of bone loss and increasing bone density.

2. According to the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), “The right exercises and good habits can keep bones strong and prevent or reverse the effects of osteoporosis. Weight-bearing exercise, such as walking, is an important way to build and maintain healthy bones. Muscle strengthening exercises have been found to stimulate bone growth and can help prevent and treat osteoporosis. These types of exercises are best if started early in life and done regularly. However, it is important to remember that you can begin exercising at any age and still reap great benefits”.

3. Avoid exercises and daily activities which round the spine, such as sit-ups, crunches, bending down to tie your shoes, certain exercise machines that involve forward bending of the trunk, and even movements and sports that round and twist the spine. Instead, hinge forward from your hips, while keeping your back straight.

4. Practice balance exercises (even at a wall or holding on) to reduce falls and resulting fractures. An individualized program may include a walking regimen, Tai Chi, yoga, Pilates and other exercises geared toward conditioning, balance, and coordination.

5. The APTA recommends: Using proper posture and safe body mechanics during all activities protects the spine against injury. Here are some tips:
– Keep your back, stomach, and leg muscles strong and flexible.
– Do not slouch.
– Use good body positioning at work, home, or during leisure activities.
– Ask for help when lifting heavy objects.
– Maintain a regular physical fitness regimen. Staying active can help to prevent injuries.

6. Always consult with your physician or physical therapist before beginning an exercise program, if you have osteoporosis, are at high risk for a fall, fracture, or have a medical condition that might affect your ability to exercise.

If you would like to be seen right away for learning how to set-up an exercise program, prevent an injury or chronic pain under Direct Access (no prescription is required), contact us at: www.ivyrehab.com.

Ivyrehab accepts most insurance plans (which our office obtains pre-approval from your insurance carrier) and will submit your office visit treatments for payment. You will be responsible for your co-payment depending on your particular insurance policy.
With one-on-one care this permits the therapist to construct a personalized program for the individual. After all, when it comes to rehabilitation, “it’s all about the people”.

References:
1. National OP foundation, www.nof.org/osteoporosis.
2. Meeks, Sara Walk Tall. Triad Publishing Company (FL); 1st edition (June 15, 1999).
3. Bassey E. Joan, Exercise for prevention of osteoporotic fracture. Age and Aging. Nov. 2001: 29-31.
4. Rahmani, Poupak, Morin, Suzanne. Prevention of osteoporosis-related fractures among post menopausal women and older men. CMAJ. 2009:181; 815-820.
5. American Physical Therapy Association, Bone Health.http://www.moveforwardpt.com/Resources/Detail/bone-health-2