Trainer of the Month Colin Connery

June 28, 2018 by karen

July 2018 Club Fit Briarcliff Trainer of the Month Colin Connery

Colin will be giving a free-to-member presentation in our Conference Room on Monday, July 9th at 11:00 am and Tuesday, July 17th  at 6:00 pm
Subject: Benefits of Powerlifting

Club Fit Personal Trainer Colin Connery
Club Fit Personal Trainer Colin Connery

My name is Colin Connery and I am a Personal Trainer at Club Fit. For me, it all started with sports. In high school I played lacrosse like my two older brothers, and then when rugby came around I jumped on that opportunity with utmost enthusiasm. From then on, rugby would be my sport.

Along the way a few shoulder, hip, ankle injuries courtesy of the worlds most savage sport, would introduce me to “prehab.” Essentially prehab is the idea of taking care of your body before it gets injured or hindered. This involves proper warm ups, dynamic stretches and mobility exercises as well as stability and joint strengthening techniques. Once I took this approach, I haven’t been injured since, and could continue doing the wacky things I like to do. Knock on wood.

I also am a huge fan of more obscure sports such as: water-skiing, longboarding, snowboarding and skiing. So today, my training style revolves around remaining as spry, flexible yet stable, and strong as possible. This means that I will train myself and my clients on the principles of powerlifting, functional and athletic training, core strength, and prehab. With these various and very different forms of training, I believe that someone can develop a body that not only looks good, but is strong, sturdy, all while being limber. Without even one of these components, you can kiss your strength, durability, or mobility goodbye, and say hello to laundry list of issues.

Like anything else in life worth doing, fitness is a whole package, a lifestyle. Whatever you like to do, tennis, basketball, swimming, golf, or spelunking (you never know), do yourself a favor and do it all the way. It doesn’t start and end at the gym, it is a constant. This means actually taking time to prep your body with “boring” warmups, dealing with delayed onset muscle soreness, learning to accept failures, and most of all, consistency.

If you have the dedication and drive, if you truly want it long term, then you will accept that these things are not an option. My goal for clients is to get them to a point where they are more comfortable with themselves, and no longer rely on me for motivation, and they can be confident and motivated from within.

Prevention of Golf-Related Injuries

February 11, 2016 by Liz

Meryle Richman, PT, DPT, MS, Senior Director of Ivyrehab Briarcliff and Jefferson Valley

“Golf is a game now enjoyed by over 29.3 million golfers of all ages, shapes, and levels of physical fitness”. Although most people would agree that golf is not a rigorous sport, there is a wide range of musculoskeletal ailments associated with the full golf swing. Contrary to the slow nature of the game, the explosive action of the full swing places significant stress on shoulder, elbow, and wrist joints as well as producing high torque forces on the low back and hip structures.

Golfers of all levels could benefit from an effective golf-training program that serves a dual purpose of improving performance and reducing the risk for injury. Golfers have learned that it is much easier to make a mechanically correct swing when the body is strong and flexible. Golf fitness should include three major components: (1) maintaining and improving flexibility, (2) improving golf specific strength, and (3) improving postural balance and stability.

Flexibility & Strengthening Exercises:

Pre-season is a good time to begin a generalized stretching and strengthening program for your neck, back and extremities. For example, increasing joint flexibility can lengthen your swing; thus increasing the club head speed and result in longer shots. Increasing golf specific muscle strength requires an integrated, multi-joint strengthening program to allow for coordinated actions of major muscle groups of different body segments. The golf swing can also inherently create postural imbalances, which can lead to injury.

The most common injuries are discussed with stretching and exercise tips can help to prevent or reduce pain and/or injuries resulting from the repetitive nature of the golf swing coupled with the high velocity forces:

(1) Medial epicondylitis, or “golfer’s elbow”:
This ailment involves increased inflammation and pain on the inside of the right elbow (for right-handed golfers). Exercise Tip: A proper conditioning program will include wrist flexion/extension and supination/pronation (rotation of wrist clockwise and counter-clockwise) strengthening and stretching.

(2) Shoulder tendonitis, or “rotator cuff tendonitis”:

This can be a chronic problem for those with tight shoulder internal/external rotators and weak shoulder girdle stabilizers. Exercise Tip: The golfer who has concentrated his efforts in developing maximum strength and flexibility of the levator scapulae, rhomboids, sternocleidomastoid, rotator cuff muscles, and trapezius muscles will enjoy the greatest success.

(3) Low back pain:
This can affect most golfers at one time or another. The golf swing combines “unnatural” spinal movements of bending forward, bending backward, bending sideways, and rotating. Exercise Tip: A preventative-conditioning program will incorporate multi-directional stretching and strengthening 2-3 times a week with an 8-minute warm-up routine before playing. For example, a before round warm-up exercise routine would include knee to chest, modified squats, back extensions, shoulder stretch, and low back/neck rotations and sidebands. All exercises would be done in sets of five performed in a smooth, controlled manner.

(4) Neck Pain:
One important aspect often overlooked when striving for the pain free neck is unrestricted cervical spine rotation. The ability to “retract” your neck (or slightly tucking your chin) and fully rotate your chin to the left is necessary to achieve a good “top of back swing position” (for the right-handed golfer). Any limitation in flexibility in either plane of motion can cause muscle strain/or nerve pinching. The shearing and rotational stresses occurring at the lower neck at the top of backswing will be minimized with good muscle flexibility. Exercise Tip: Gentle rotation and side bending neck stretches done two times daily for duration of twenty seconds each will help eliminate pain and restriction.

Another reason for neck pain is mechanical in nature, often caused by overstretching of ligaments due to postural stresses. The golfer who spends countless hours practicing with the head in a forward, protruded position will always be at high risk to develop cervical (neck) pain. The walker versus the cart rider has far greater neck support as the postural muscles hold the head directly over the vertebral column, receiving maximum muscle support. The golf cart rider sits and relaxes in a cart approximately 75 times during a round. Exercise Tip: To avoid and minimize the forward head position, slightly tuck the chin and do this 2-3 times and hold for several seconds, while sitting in the golf cart.

Posture awareness and physical preparedness are key elements to pain free golf. If you have questions concerning screening examination or treatment of golf-related injuries feel free to contact our office and speak to a physical therapist.

Call to set up a free appointment if you would like to attend this free Golf Fitness Screening located inside Ivyrehab Briarcliff at (914)762-2222. In addition, if you would like to be seen right away for an injury or chronic pain under Direct Access (no prescription required), contact us at Ivyrehab Briarcliff at (914) 762-2222; or Ivyrehab Jefferson Valley at (914) 245-8807. You can also visit our website at www.ivyrehab.com.

Ivyrehab accepts most insurance plans (which our office obtains pre-approval from your insurance carrier) and will submit your office visit treatments for payment. You will be responsible for your co-payment depending on your particular insurance policy.

With one-on-one care this permits the therapist to construct a personalized program for the individual. After all, when it comes to rehabilitation, “it’s all about the people”.

References:
1) http://www.statista.com/statistics/227420/number-of-golfers-usa/
2) Batt, M., A Survey of Golf Injuries, British Journal of Sports Medicine 63-65, 1992
3) www.livestrong.com

Free Golf Screenings held inside Ivyrehab Briarcliff with Brian McLean, DPT, Director:
Monday, March 7, 2016 4:00- 7:00 PM
Tuesday March 8, 2016 9:00-11:00 AM
Wednesday, March 9, 2016 4:00-7:00 PM

Ivy Rehab

Prevention Tips for Tennis Injuries

January 28, 2016 by Liz

By Meryle Richman, PT, DPT, MS, Senior Director at Ivyrehab Briarcliff & Jefferson Valley

Tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis) typically affects middle aged (40 to 60 years of age) adults and only 1 in 20 play tennis. If you have pain and/tenderness on the inside of your elbow, that is not going away it could be caused by different reasons such as improper techniques, poor physical conditioning, weight of the tennis racquet, too much tension on the strings of the racquet, balls are too heavy, type of court surface you are playing on and the grip size of the racquet. Other causes for lateral epicondylitis come from repeated forcible extension of the wrist such as using a screwdriver, heavy lifting and shoveling snow. Overuse of the muscles that extend the wrist usually has no pain at rest, but will increase with activity.

Treatment of tennis elbow focuses on relieving pain, controlling inflammation, promoting healing, improving local and general fitness and controlling force loads and repetitive movements with the wrists. Physical therapy uses a variety of modalities to relieve pain and decrease inflammation, massage and soft tissue mobilization techniques to heal the tissues. In addition, the following stretching and exercises are also recommended:

NOTE: the recommended stretching and exercises should not cause any increase pain. In the event that they do, you should stop immediately and consult with your physician.

Stretching Tips

● Forearm stretch:
Hold arm straight out, fingers pointed towards the floor. Use your opposite hand and pull the fingers towards the body until a stretch is felt. Hold 10 seconds, repeat 3 times.
Repeat same as above, but fingers are pointed towards the ceiling. Use the opposite hand to fingers towards you. Hold 10 seconds, repeat 3 times.

● Racquet stretch:
Stand with your feet shoulder width apart. Hold your racquet at the top of its frame with the right hand behind your head. Grasp the grip of the racquet with the left hand and slowly pull the racquet down the back. Hold 15 – 20 seconds. Repeat 3 times. Switch hands and do in the opposite direction

● Scapular Stretch:
Cross the right arm in front of the left shoulder letting the elbow bend so that the hand droops over the left shoulder. With the left hand on the right elbow, push your arm in towards the back of the room. Hold for 15 – 20 seconds. Repeat 3 times.

● Arm overhead stretch:
Take your left hand over your head. Bend it at the elbow, so that your left hand is over your head near your right ear. Then take the right hand and push the left elbow with it more toward the right. Hold for 15 – 20 seconds. Repeat 3 times

● Hands behind the back stretch:
Grasp your hands behind your back while holding them at the wrist. Pull your left hand more towards the right and then do in the opposite direction. Hold 10 – 15 seconds. Repeat 2 -3 times

Recommended Strengthening Exercises

● Ball Gripping: Use a soft ball and repetitively squeeze to strengthen the forearm muscles. Do 100 – 200 times a day.

● Wrist curls: Support your forearm on a table and stabilize your wrist with your other hand. Hold a 1 – 2 pound weight and bring your wrist up toward the ceiling and then back down. Now turn your palm up and once again bend your wrist toward the ceiling. Do 10 times/ 3 sets. Increase in 1/2 pound increments.

● Broom – Handle Exercise: Take a stick and hang a 1 – 2 pound weight from a string to the stick. Keep the arms held out in front, with the palms down and attempt to roll the weight up and then back down. Repeat with palms up. Do 10 times/3 sets.

Call to set up a free appointment if you would like to attend this free Tennis Screening at Ivyrehab Jefferson Valley (914) 245-8807 on February 23, 2016 from 7:15-7:45 PM. In addition, if you would like to be seen right away for an injury or chronic pain under Direct Access (no prescription is required), contact us at or Ivyrehab Jefferson Valley (914) 245-8807 or Ivyrehab Briarcliff at (914) 762-2222. You can also visit our website at www.ivyrehab.com.

Ivyrehab accepts most insurance plans (which our office obtains pre-approval from your insurance carrier) and will submit your office visit treatments for payment. You will be responsible for your co-payment depending on your particular insurance policy.
With one-on-one care this permits the therapist to construct a personalized program for the individual. After all, when it comes to rehabilitation, “it’s all about the people”.

Ivy Rehab

Free Sport Readiness and Injury Prevention Screening

Location: Inside Ivyrehab Jefferson Valley
February 23, 2016 at 7:15 -7:45 PM with Deborah Cohen, MSPT

Stretch Your Way Into Wellness

April 3, 2014 by Liz

by Meryle Richman, PT, DPT, MS, CST, RYT

According to the Mayo Clinic, although studies have shown that the benefits of stretching are mixed, stretching has great benefits. Stretching can help you improve your joint range of motion, which in turn may help improve your athletic performance, decrease your risk of injury, improve flexibility and increase the blood flow to your muscles. Understand and learn how to stretch safely by using proper techniques.

Here are some tips to know about stretching:

How long?

– Hold the stretch 15 to 30 seconds is ideal
– Repeat 3 to 5 repetitions each time

How?

– Gentle
– Sustained
– No bouncing
– Slow
– Use proper posture/technique

REMEMBER TO BREATHE while stretching!

Stretch with Caution!

In some cases, you may need to approach stretching with caution. If you have a chronic condition or an injury, you may need to adjust your stretching techniques. For example, if you already have a strained muscle, stretching it may cause further harm. Also, don’t think that because you stretch you can’t get injured.

If you would like to learn more about stretching stop by Physical Therapy at Briarcliff (914)762 – 2222 or Physical therapy at Jefferson (914) 245 – 8807 or visit our website at www.ptrehab.com.

Ivy Rehab
Stretch Your Way into Wellness. FREE presentation by Jacek Golis, M.S.P.T. 10:30 am–11:00 am. Sign up in IvyRehab office. 914-245-8807.

Mayo Clinic: the art of stretching